Brushfire burns almost an acre near Quinn’s Junction | ParkRecord.com

Brushfire burns almost an acre near Quinn’s Junction

Fire started at the base of a power pole, authorities say

A small brush fire charred almost an acre near Quinnís Junction on Friday. The fire did not cause any evacuations. (Kira Hoffelmeyer/Park Record)

A brushfire that started on Friday at the base of a power pole charred almost an acre of land near Quinn's Junction, according to the Park City Fire District.

Crews had to move fencing out of the way to allow fire vehicles access to the blaze near Quinnís Junction on Friday. Firefighters with Park City Fire District and North Summit Fire District were on scene. (Kira Hoffelmeyer/Park Record)

At 12:45 p.m. Friday, fire crews from Summit County and the Utah Division of State Forestry responded to the fire southeast of Quinn's Junction along State Road 248. Firefighters from Park City Fire District and North Summit Fire District were on scene.

Steve Zwirn, a battalion chief with the Park City Fire District, said the fire occurred in an area near a cluster of power poles and spread quickly due to extreme wind conditions.

"The wind actually started out causing it to spread rapidly," he said. "But, the wind actually shifted and then slowed down the progress. It blew back on itself."

The blaze was 90 percent contained within a couple of hours. As of 2:15 p.m. Friday, Zwirn said crews were expected to be on scene for at least two more hours.

A small brush fire started just east of I-40 on Kearns Boulevard this afternoon around 1 p.m. The fire did not cause any evacuations, but did burn 3/4s of an acre. (Kira Hoffelmeyer/Park Record)

Only one building was threatened by the fire, Zwirn said, adding "it burned real close to it, within feet." He said the building is used to house communications equipment for a cellphone service company. No other nearby businesses or structures were threatened.

"We just want to let our community know that the fire danger is still active until the snow flies," he said. "Even though it is fall and the temperatures have dropped, the fuels are dry and will burn if people aren't careful."

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