Park City Community Foundation helps fund expansion of programs with grants | ParkRecord.com

Park City Community Foundation helps fund expansion of programs with grants

The Park City Community Foundation gave Marielle Pariseau a chance when they awarded her a grant last year to pilot a program that teaches kindergarten students to floss and brush their teeth every day after lunch. It was a success in her eyes, but she was validated after the foundation again opted to fund the expanding program.

At the foundation's annual grant celebration on Thursday, it awarded more than $170,000 to 38 nonprofits that serve people in Summit County, including Pariseau's nonprofit TeethFirst. Representatives from each of the grant recipients spoke about what they intend to use the funds for, which included mental health programs, youth summer camps and legal immigration services.

Deanna Rhodes, marketing and communications manager for the foundation, said the amount of grants awarded was about $50,000 more than last year because of increased donations. John Hanrahan was honored with the Trisha J. Worthington Community Service Award for his work with the People's Health Clinic, The Hope Alliance and the Park City Rotary Club.

The Park City Sailing Association, which has received grants for the last few years, was awarded $1,500, said Ken Block, board member of the nonprofit. It plans to use the funding to expand its Out Reach and Therapeutic Sailing Program, in which people struggling with PTSD, addictions and mental health issues go sailing to practice mindfulness, trusting strangers and working with a team.

With this grant and others, Block said the association is able to make it so any individual or group can go sailing, regardless of their financial situation.

Previous grants from the foundation were used to bring underserved kids in the community on junior sailing camps.

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"We are always looking at trying to obtain funds so that, when an opportunity avails itself, we don't have to say, 'This is what our fee is,'" he said. "We actually say, 'We are going to sail. How much can you contribute and we will make sure the event happens.'"

Pariseau also hopes to use the grant to add to her nonprofit's offerings. To accompany the flossing and brushing program, she is launching a curriculum on oral education that is expected to be taught in the classrooms at McPolin Elementary School, where the pilot took place last year.

She said she was grateful for the grant, but also glad to be a part of the entire nonprofit community that was recognized at the event. Being surrounded by other nonprofits and hearing what they have accomplished inspires her, she said.

Carolyn Wawra, executive director of Recycle Utah, also said the event was a time to celebrate all the good work nonprofits in the community do.

"Everybody's issue is important, from open space to People's Health Clinic to mental health services to the Park City Film Series," she said. "Each of them are so different, but every nonprofit touches people's everyday lives."

After receiving one-time grants from the foundation every year since 2009, Recycle Utah received its first multi-year grant, which will provide $5,000 to the nonprofit every year for the next three years. Wawra said Recycle Utah plans to use that money to fund its environmental education and packing foam recycling operations. She said being recognized with a recurring grant showed the organization that the foundation trusts them and believes in the work they are doing.