Wild Women Tribe rallies female business owners in Park City | ParkRecord.com

Wild Women Tribe rallies female business owners in Park City

Renée Huang began her search by reaching out to a couple of women who own businesses in Park City. She asked if they would be interested in partnering for the wilderness workshops she planned to host.

Seven months and two dozen businesses later, Huang has formed a community.

Huang's business, Wild Women Tribe, offers workshops in nature for women of all ages and walks of life. Several women-owned businesses around Park City have partnered with Huang to donate or discount goods and services to support her budding business and help run the events.

For Huang's first workshop, she partnered with Allison Page, the owner of the outdoor therapy business Trailtalk. Then, she started working with the Tadasana Yoga Studio and Hugo Coffee Roasters. From there, partnerships started exploding.

"It's been so empowering in and of itself to see other women step in and step up and say, 'We love what you are doing,' and 'Anything that we can do to help, we want to do,'" she said.

The business owners said they have enjoyed being involved in Huang's growth. Claudia McMullin, founder and owner of Hugo Coffee Roasters, welcomed a group of women into her coffee shop to create "vision boards," which are posters with images and words that represent goals, in January. McMullin then provided discounted meals to the participants, as well as bags of coffee for the swag bags that participants took home.

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"I try to promote any women-owned business and any entrepreneur," she said. "I try to help people who are trying to make their mark."

In some ways, Huang is giving back to those who support her. She is spreading the word about the businesses that she collaborates with.

Sarah Woodward was a yoga instructor on a retreat that Huang recently led in Moab. As a new licensed yoga teacher at Tadasana Yoga Studio, she loved the experience.

"For me it was awesome to get my name out there and get exposure as a retreat teacher," she said.

Woodward was also able to chat with other business owners involved with the retreat, as well as women with their own work histories who attended as participants.

"Everyone was at a different place with their business, whether it was new, growing or well-established," she said.

In creating Wild Women Tribe, Huang expected to foster connections with participants during the workshops, but she did not anticipate the partnerships she formed with business owners who helped her.

"It became this really cool outwardly expanding network of women supporting women on multiple levels," she said. "All these people came out of the woodwork."

Recently, Kelly Pfaff, co-founder and co-owner of the Prospect Executive Suites, reached out to help Huang with the summer series of workshops, which will include topics about photography, fear and creation. She is donating the space for the meet-ups.

Pfaff said that she also finds joy in connecting individuals and groups, so she was happy to be a part of something that is focused on uniting people.

"We all have stories and, through sharing our stories or learning new things, I think it makes us stronger," she said.

Huang said that it has been helpful for her to meet the women business owners who are supporting her because they have faced similar challenges in starting a new venture, and she can lean on them for advice and inspiration.

She is eager to continue building connections in the community, and predicts that the network she is assembling will only continue to expand.

"The climate is really ripe for women to step up for each other," she said.