Developer pushes Quinn’s project | ParkRecord.com

Developer pushes Quinn’s project

Jay Hamburger OF THE RECORD STAFF

Developers are pushing a new project at Quinn’s Junction, a new iteration of a more ambitious idea that was contemplated at the beginning of the decade.

City Hall is considering a request by the Park City Heights developers to annex land at the southwest corner of Quinn’s Junction, across S.R. 248 from the Park City Ice Arena.

The developers want an approval that allows 131 lots, but Walter Plumb, who is under contract to purchase the land, said the details of the project are undecided.

The government this week held an open house at the ice arena to explain the project but there was little interest from regular Parkites and lots of the people who attended were government officials from City Hall or part of the development team.

Plumb seems proud when talking about what he sees being "a great addition to Park City."

He touted the location as close to where Intermountain Healthcare wants to build a hospital, the first in Park City’s modern era. Hospital officials have also engaged City Hall in annexation talks but the government is not scheduled yet to decide whether to allow the hospital.

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Plumb said the project will be designed well, saying that the buildings will not ruin the expansive views of open space because the project will not be intrusive and the buildings will not be placed on hillsides.

"I can’t think of a better place for a neighborhood," Plumb said, noting that few people live nearby who might be unhappy with the project.

The area around the land is largely undeveloped, but speculators have for some time been interested in Quinn’s Junction, seeing it as a spot for larger projects since much of the land in Park City’s current boundaries is developed.

Plumb expects that his annexation request will be approved by City Hall.

But as more developers eye land at Quinn’s Junction, there are ongoing concerns by officials with the city regarding traffic and the design of the projects. They are leery of what is widely seen as hodgepodge development at Kimball Junction and do not want Quinn’s Junction to resemble the development surrounding the Interstate 80-S.R. 224 interchange.

Annexations require a recommendation from the Planning Commission and then a vote by the Park City Council. The Park City Heights discussions date to 2005 and included a July 2005 meeting in which the Planning Commission had concerns about the project’s design, the open-space designation and traffic, according to a report submitted to the City Council this week.

The City Council on Thursday formed a task force to consider the application. The elected officials required that the task force disband after it makes a recommendation to the Planning Commission and said in the resolution creating the panel that the City Council must grant permission for the task force to stay intact past May 4, 2007.

Developers have especially been interested in the property since the early part of the decade, when a previous team proposed to build what was known as Park City Country Club Estates.

The development sought in that project was much larger than the current proposal. In 2000, there was talk of designing Country Club Estates as a golf course community with between 800 and 1,000 houses and condominiums and a 400-room hotel.

The talks between City Hall and the Country Club Estates developers never progressed far and the land changed hands.