Donna McAleer: issues interrelated | ParkRecord.com

Donna McAleer: issues interrelated

by Jay Hamburger THE PARK RECORD

NAME: Donna McAleer

AGE: 46

RESIDENCE: Pinebrook

EXPERIENCE: Army officer, management consultant, nonprofit executive

WEBSITE: dmcaleer.com

Donna McAleer, a Democrat who is vying for the party’s nomination in Utah’s 1st Congressional District, sees some of the most notable political issues in the state today as being connected.

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Schools cannot be looked at without considering the economy while energy and the environment are related, she said. McAleer said she would legislate with the idea that the various issues hinge on one another.

"In Utah, our economy, our education, the environment and our energy policies are not mutually exclusive. They’re all interrelated," she said.

McAleer outlines an economic platform to address the deficit and said the country has an "unsustainable debt level." She wants Congress to target the nation’s spending as well as consider the amount of revenue it collects. McAleer said "both sides of the balance sheet" must be addressed.

She wants to make it easier to create jobs and said businesses should have wider opportunities to tap private capital. McAleer said Washington should consider reducing regulations that are barriers to creating jobs, but she did not identify those she wants reviewed.

McAleer said education policies are critical and said an educated work force is needed to compete for jobs and grow the economy. She wants science, technology, engineering and math curriculums strengthened. McAleer would also like vocational and technical training expanded.

"You build coalitions, work across party lines. Make teachers part of the solution," she said, adding that she wants the federal Department of Education to remain intact.

McAleer said she does not support the idea to build SkiLink, a gondola connecting Canyons and Solitude Mountain Resort. The idea’s future hinges on the sale of a little more than 30 acres of federal land to Canyons. Her concerns about the idea include the watershed, wildlife and the impacts on backcountry recreation.

"Once we give that land away, it’s gone forever," she said.