Dungeon Party to thank residents | ParkRecord.com

Dungeon Party to thank residents

Dan Bischoff, Of the Record Staff

The annual Dungeon Party at the Park City Museum has nothing to do with dragons or long-haired, bearded men who have been imprisoned for a lifetime.

Or is it?

"The dungeon in the basement was a real working jail in the mining days," said Julie Hopkins, a board member of the Park City museum and historical society.

But, as most things associated with the society, that’s all in the past. What was once a dark basement for Park City convicts, now is used for a celebration.

The Dungeon Party runs Nov. 17 from 5 to 7:30 p.m. at the Park City Museum. Festivities will be throughout the museum. As is customary, historical characters will visit. They will tell their life stories and what life was like in Park City. Also, an unveiling of plans for the museums expansion will be revealed.

"The Dungeon Party is the museum’s way of saying ‘thank you’ to our members," Hopkins said.

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The Historical Society is providing drinks and food and members can come in for free. If people are not members, they can join at the door. It is $15 for a membership that includes free access to the museum, free access to the walking and skiing tours and 10 percent off of museum products and the home tour.

The Historical society at times struggles to keep the museum alive to help Parkites remember their past. The members are the ones who keep it afloat.

"We can’t do it without support from community. This party is our way of saying thank you,’ Hopkins said.

The history of Park City is what separates this town from other ski resort destinations.

"We are one of the few ski towns in America that has a true history," Hopkins said. "That history we see all throughout Old Town is unique and a special place for tourists to come visit."

Drawings of the museum expansion will also be shared with the community at the party. San Francisco designers have been hired to plan the new additions, which will begin construction in 2007.

"We’ll show everyone there the drawings and exhibit ideas," Hopkins said. "There are more creative and interactive ideas than any museum I’ve ever seen. They are going to showcase our town so well."