Editorial | ParkRecord.com


Big challenges, changes are on tap for local government

January usually comes with a changing of the guard at City Hall. But this month, which follows an off-election year at most levels of government, won’t see much of a change at the Marsac Building.

Park City Council member Marianne Cone stepped down after four years of dedicated service, choosing not to run for a second term. Cone deserves credit for fighting to maintain the integrity of historic Old Town and advocating sustainability in new construction.

Two other incumbents whose terms were due to end, Candy Erickson and Joe Kernan, were successful in their bids to serve again, so there will be only one new face on the council for the next two years, at least.

Liza Simpson, an Old Town resident like Cone, is the newcomer on the board. But as a longtime activist on city boards and committees, the transition is not likely to cause any waves.

That is not to say, though, the city council members won’t be busy. While the council and mayor have enjoyed a lot of public support over the last four years, there are still plenty of tough issues on the table. Traffic and affordable housing are on the top of that list.

this time next year, local citizens will be ushering in a slew of new elected officials, especially at the county level, and the time to begin preparing for the new guard begins soon. The political scene should start to heat up in March as county residents scour the political playing field for candidates willing to usher in a brand new form of government.

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There will be five vacancies to fill on the new county council and the filing window is March 7-17. It will be a partisan election, so local party bosses are, no doubt, already plotting how to further their own agendas by soliciting candidates. But our hope is that regular residents will begin talking to their friends and neighbors about running for next November’s watershed Summit County election.

It is not too soon to begin that process.