Park City High School senior selected for national science camp | ParkRecord.com

Park City High School senior selected for national science camp

Tali Kottler, a senior at Park City High School, was recently awarded a National Youth Science Camp Award and will be attending the prestigious camp in the summer.

Tali Kottler's passion for science started at an early age.

As a young child, she would gather ingredients from the kitchen with her brother and mix them with water to make "potions." This summer, the senior at Park City High School will spend about a month doing experiments and learning about science during the National Youth Science Camp.

Kottler was one of two students in Utah selected to attend the camp, which takes place near the Green Bank Observatory in Bartow, West Virginia from June 27 to July 21. Two students are chosen from each state in the U.S., as well as students from about 10 other countries. The camp is entirely funded by the National Youth Science Foundation.

Kottler said that she is eager to go to the camp because she wants to learn more about science, but also to meet individuals who share her interests from around the world.

"I am really excited to hang out and get to know a lot of people who are passionate about science," she said.

She heard about the camp about two weeks before the application was due and knew that she wanted to do it. Quickly, she wrote and submitted an essay. When she found out she was selected, she almost didn't believe it.

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During the camp, the students will attend lectures and participate in outdoor activities, such as climbing, caving, backpacking and mountain biking. It is the camp's 55th year in operation.

Kottler is involved in the robotics club at the high school. She was a member of the Robominers team, which made it to the FIRST World Championships last month. She is also on the Teen Advisory Board for the Summit County Library and the Utah Women Tech Council SheTech Student Board.

Her favorite subject is chemistry, which she said is fun because she can find real-life applications everywhere.

"If you understand how chemistry works, you can better understand how everything in the world works," she said.

She plans on pursuing a degree and career in chemistry when she starts at Carleton College in Minnesota in the fall.