Female press pioneer inducted | ParkRecord.com

Female press pioneer inducted

Adia Waldburger, of the Record staff

Fifty years ago, Ethel Bradford walked into the offices of the Murray Eagle-Green Sheet Newspaper, (now Murray Printing, the home of The Park Record presses), in response to an ad for an front office worker and then owner/publisher Jim Cornwell said, "That’s our gal."

Little did Cornwell realize at the time that Ethel would become a pioneer and model for female journalists everywhere.

Last week, Bradford was inducted into the Murray Mayor’s Hall of Fame for citizens who have made a lasting impact on the community. On hand were Bradford’s family, former Murray Eagle-Green Sheet staff and Park Record publisher Andy Bernhard all gathered to honor Bradford’s legacy and the impact she has had on Utah newspapers and countless citizens.

"An honor like this is not dreamed of or aimed at," Bradford said.

When she was hired Bradford may not have been aware of the difference she would make in so many people’s lives. Bradford, now 89, began writing her column "Out my Window," soon after she was hired and continued to write for the Murray Eagle-Green Sheet newspaper for four decades. "Out My Window," was billed as a unique mixture of Bradford’s family, joys, troubles and musings on life, but any loyal reader of the column knew it was so much more. For decades, Bradford would use the column to discuss her spiritual journey, her thoughts on political and social issues and issue calls to action for her community.

It was in Bradford’s column that she said everyone should adopt Murray Mayor Daniel Snarr’s "Wave at a Neighbor" slogan and it soon became the official slogan of the city and still runs on all official Murray stationary.

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But Bradford’s reach was far longer than Murray. She served as the President of the Utah Press Women, was a member of National Press Women and received numerous state and national awards as a columnist and as the women’s editor for the paper. At one point, she taught a class at the Utah State Prison called "Change Your Thinking and You’ll Change Your Life."

Bradford changed many minds and many lives.

"It didn’t’ matter that every reader came to know all about me, for I found that beneath our facades, we’re all the same," Ethel wrote in her memoirs.

Bradford continues to work part-time for Murray Printing. Her picture and accomplishments can be viewed at the Murray Mayor’s Hall of Fame located at the Murray City offices.