Incumbent councilman will run again in ’10 | ParkRecord.com

Incumbent councilman will run again in ’10

Patrick Parkinson, Of the Record staff

Veteran Republican David Ure said he wants to serve four more years on the Summit County Council before he retires from politics.

The Republican announced Monday that he will campaign this year for a second council term.

"This will be the last term," Ure said in a telephone interview.

Ure’s seat is one of two, four-year council terms on the ballot this year. Ure and Summit County Councilman Chris Robinson were each elected to serve two years in 2008. The three other councilpersons were elected that year to serve four years.

Ure, a Kamas dairy farmer, is the only councilperson who lives on the East Side of Summit County.

"I know the vast majority of people on the East Side depend on me to be their voice," Ure said.

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Some people on the East Side still grow crops and raise livestock to earn their livings. While the economy in the Snyderville Basin and Park City is driven by tourism and the sale of real estate.

Ure, a former state legislator, said he understands both regions having worked 14 years serving Summit County as a member of the state House of Representatives.

"I have learned from both sides," Ure said. "I was born and raised on the East Side but I spent a lot of time in the Legislature learning what the West Side is all about."

A candidate for the Summit County Council will not succeed in an election without gaining some support from voters on the West Side, said Ure, who is 58 years old.

"I’m sure there are other people out there who will probably run from the East Side, but maybe I stand a little stronger chance of getting back on the council than someone else from the East Side would," Ure said.

Ure was elected to seat E on the Summit County Council by defeating South Summit Democrat Steve Weinstein. In 2009, the form of government in Summit County changed from a three-person commission to the five-member County Council with an appointed manager who oversees day-to-day operations.

Many people on the East Side who fiercely opposed the change still do not support the new form of government. Helping bridge the philosophical rift that divides Summit County would be one of his top priorities if he is re-elected, Ure said.

"It’s not East against West. It’s Summit County," Ure said. "The reason we have differences of opinions is because we don’t communicate enough."

The split is evident in the battle some landowners are waging against officials for looser zoning rules in eastern Summit County. The Eastern Summit County Planning Commission is getting close to recommending the Summit County Council adopt a new mission statement that may guide development on the East Side for several years.

"I would definitely like to make sure that a planning-and-zoning mission statement is in place that really represents a majority of the people on the East Side," Ure said.

Ure has kept his campaign promise that he would not vote to raise taxes in his first term. But weathering the economic downturn will mean the new form of government in the county will need continuity in its leadership, he said.

"It would be to the advantage of the county to try for at least four to six years to have as much continuity as we can," Ure said. "As a council there are still things that we need to get our arms around."

The window opens March 12 for people to officially declare their candidacies for various county, state and federal offices.

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