Jeremy Ranch roundabout work to start June 10, close park and ride | ParkRecord.com

Jeremy Ranch roundabout work to start June 10, close park and ride

A rendering of the nearly 250-foot wide roundabout that will be installed north of the interstate near Jeremy Ranch.
Courtesy of Summit County

Construction season is beginning in earnest, as the $13 million project to install two massive roundabouts at the Interstate 80 on- and off-ramps at Jeremy Ranch is planned to get underway June 10.

Motorists likely won’t feel the pinch for a couple weeks as the work ramps up, county spokesperson Krachel Murdock said, but those who use the nearby Jeremy Ranch park-and-ride lot will be impacted much sooner.

The park-and-ride, which connects public transit riders to Salt Lake City and Park City many times a day, will be closed starting June 17, regional transportation planning director Caroline Rodriguez said, and her office is working the Utah Transit Authority to finalize the transit detours.

She said services will most likely relocate to the Ecker Hill park-and-ride, which is a little more than a mile away on the south side of the interstate. That will include recycling services currently housed at the Jeremy Ranch location.

Construction is expected to last through the fall, with the contract stipulating that the improvements must be drivable by Oct. 26, Murdock said. Finishing touches like painting lines and landscaping may last through November.

At least one lane will remain open throughout the project on Homestead Road, Kilby Road, Lookout Drive and Pinebrook Boulevard, according to a county news release, and the work isn’t expected to close any roads, driveways or businesses.

Delays are expected as the work progresses, the release states, but the goal is to stop traffic for no more than three minutes at a time.

The county has discussed improving the intersections for more than a decade, settling on the roundabout configuration in 2015. The plan is to create two roundabouts nearly 250 feet in diameter, one on the north side of the interstate and one on the south, with two lanes of traffic going around each. They will be five times as large as the one on Kilby Road near Ecker Hill Middle School, Murdock said, and twice as big as the one near Walmart.

Traffic lights would have cost almost twice as much, according to studies commissioned by the county, and would have resulted in roads five or six lanes wide because of the short distance between intersections and the amount of traffic. Evaluations of the various options incorporated expected traffic increases through 2050.

Roundabouts are seen as more efficient for vehicle traffic, as cars and trucks can keep moving, but that makes it less hospitable for pedestrians and bikers. The project includes three planned tunnels or underpasses for human-powered travel, as well as crosswalks with flashing beacons to alert drivers.

The project was estimated to cost $10.6 million, but construction costs pushed it to $12.7 million. The federal government is contributing a little more than $1 million, while the state is kicking in about $2.4 million. The Utah Department of Transportation agreed to increase its funding by about $460,000 after the project costs increased. The county plans to pay the difference using its mineral lease fund, traffic impact fees, and money from a voter-approved transportation sales tax.

Those interested in regular email updates about the work may sign up by emailing info@letsgosummit.com.


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