Letters: Leaders must set aside politics to address climate change | ParkRecord.com

Letters: Leaders must set aside politics to address climate change

Set aside partisan differences

Editor:

Last month, Lisa Murkowski, the Republican leader of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, called on lawmakers of both parties to “lower emissions, to address the reality of climate change, recognizing we’ve got an economy we need to keep strong, that we have vulnerable people we need to protect, that we have an environment that we all care about — Republicans and Democrats.”

Here in Summit County, we depend on our mountain economy. It is critical that we reduce emissions of heat-trapping gases that are making the situation worse.

We support the Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act, which would place a steadily rising fee on carbon pollution and return all revenue to households equally. This bill: (a) is a market-based approach with bipartisan support, (b) will drive down carbon pollution while putting money in people’s pockets, (c) is good for business and will create jobs.

We call upon Sens. Lee and Romney to support this important legislation.

It’s time to set aside partisan differences and, for the good of our nation and the world, start addressing the threat of climate change by enacting the bipartisan Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act.

Dirk and Margaret Olson
Park City


Put your judgments aside

Editor:

As humans, we need to judge. Our survival depends on it. Judgment is how we assess danger. It is a tool for survival. Yet, judgment threatens our ability to empower people. Why? Because it prevents us from understanding them.

Think about what happens when somebody comes to you with a problem. Your urge is to solve it. However, most of the time, they are not asking for a solution. They’re asking to be understood so you can help them solve their problem on their own. Yet, your judgments get in the way.

When we listen with judgment, we attack. We put others on the defensive. We shut down their ideas. We hold them back.

We’re all entitled to our own opinions. We just have to know when to keep them to ourselves and how to express them in a constructive way. We can do this with “non-judgmental listening.”

With non-judgmental listening, we listen to understand instead of listening to fix. We put our own beliefs and values to the side. This is easier said than done. We’re often unaware we’re judging until it’s too late.

Non-judgemntal listening does not mean you will not judge. It means you will listen without allowing yourself to apply your judgments to what you hear. We become aware of our judgments. We gain control. And we get to choose. Do we respond with judgment? Sometimes this is necessary. Or do we listen without it?

When we listen without judgment, we understand. We put others on the offensive. We nurture their ideas. We empower them.

Rick Lindquist
Salt Lake City


Exemplary attitude

Editor:

Ben Ramsey’s story, ‘Sweat and tears, but a little less blood’ in the April 20 edition was extremely well written. Lauren Salko’s management of her Type 1 diabetes, and especially her attitude, are a model for us all.

Jim Doilney
Park City


Rules for the Rail Trail

Editor:

So, it has begun … the snow is mostly melted from the Rail Trail and we are already out walking, running and cycling. Let’s all do our best to make sure we are doing our part to keep the path safe and enjoyable for everyone. Cyclists please call out to those on foot; dog owners please respect the leash laws and pick up after your pets. If we can all do those two simple things, we can all have a good time taking advantage of another one of Park City’s landmarks.

Barbara Connell
Park City


The mission continues

Editor:

“How can our community improve mental health treatment” was a question The Park Record posed to its readers in the April 20 issue. That question has been at the forefront of CONNECT Summit County’s mission and at the core of the organization’s inception.

In 2016, a small group of parents were expressing frustration about the lack of mental health resources available, and when they did happen to find a resource, there was no accessibility. Wait times to get services were weeks to months away … not timely enough to help. Instead of just talking about it, this group of concerned parents, friend and peers formed CONNECT Summit County to bring awareness, education and to increase accessibility of mental health resources in Summit County.

CONNECT’s mission is to create a well-informed and stigma-free community with access to mental health services for all residents of Summit County.

Beginning in June, CONNECT Summit County will have its Resource Navigation Services operational. This will be a phone number and email address that residents of Summit County can call, text or email and interact with a live person — someone with firsthand experience navigating the behavioral health system — and get real-time assistance in their search for resources, support, treatment and information. This is not a crisis number or counseling service but a tool to help individuals navigate the complexities of the mental health system.

CONNECT’s online resource and provider directory is already up and running and accessible. Please visit connectnetworkofcare.org to learn more about local providers and resources.

Be sure to check out our websiteConnectSummitCounty.org for a full schedule of May’s Mental Health Awareness Month events and CONNECT’s year-round support groups and classes for individuals struggling with behavioral health challenges and their loved ones.

Sheri Fisher
CONNECT Summit County acting executive director


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