Letters: Parkites must clean up after pets in parks and on trails | ParkRecord.com

Letters: Parkites must clean up after pets in parks and on trails

Clean up after your dogs

Editor:
Some of our favorite community amenities are those spaces that allow us to recreate with our four-legged friends. Dog parks, trails, off-leash areas — these spots allow us all to stretch our legs and enjoy time with our animals. Unfortunately, the stinky actions of a minority currently threaten the enjoyment of these amenities for the majority.

At the outset, Basin Recreation would like to thank the community for coming out to Run-A-Muk for the annual spring cleanup, featured on the front page of last Saturday’s paper. Forty volunteers picked up upwards of 600 pounds of poop that had been left behind by dog owners. While incredibly helpful, the sheer volume of the cleanup highlights the overwhelming problem. Similar quantities have forced dog park shutdowns around the country based on health concerns such as E. coli, salmonella and giardia.

We want you and your pets to stay safe and, to do so, we need your help. We have ongoing problems with (1) owners not cleaning up after their pets, and (2) poop bags failing to make it to trash receptacles. Basin Recreation employees are working hard to maintain trails, organize events and facilitate programming for our patrons. We rely on pet owners to ensure that the pet-friendly amenities are kept clean.

We know that you all don’t want to trek through poop. We also know that you don’t want your pets to track other dogs’ poop through your houses and/or cars. You are probably getting sick of hearing us talk about poop. We are appealing to your sense of community. Please remember to leave the area cleaner than you found it and encourage your friends to do the same. Doing so will ensure the continued enjoyment of these amenities for years to come. We have another opportunity to help! Join us on May 3 from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. again at Run-A-Muk to help get this area ready for summer.

Jessica Kirby
Basin Rec open space management supervisor

Get informed about port

Editor:
I believe that as a member of Park City, that I live in a community that is well informed and that cares about what is happening in our world. I am particularly proud of our community’s sustainability goals. However, I want to make sure that, in having these goals, we continue to realize the importance of getting and staying involved in what’s going on in Salt Lake and surrounding communities. Last week I went to a “Stop the Polluting Port” community organizing meeting. I am particularly concerned about the future Inland Port’s effects on our migratory birds, which depend on the Great Salt Lake. Thousands of acres of this land is undeveloped. From what I understand, there are about 16,000 acres in the area of the planned jail that are particularly important. This land is adjacent to the Great Salt Lake, on which huge numbers of birds depend, including 5 million eared grebes, which call it home for several months a year, and the American white pelican, which nests there. I am not a birder but am trying to become informed and am astounded on how important our lake is. This year’s snowpack should be good for the shrinking lake but if patterns continue, we will get more particulate matter from the drying lake dispersed into our air, which in the end will cause more air pollution and will even affect our snowpack. Adding a huge freight storage and transfer center to this fragile landscape could be devastating. We must all try to get informed. I am very troubled on why we would take the chance of causing irreversible harm to this ecosystem, which in turn could harm our migratory birds and worsen our air quality. Please let’s all learn more and speak up to protect our greater community as a whole. You can learn more from Salt Lake Tribune articles, StopthePollutingPort.org, and UtahInlandPort.org.

Jean Tabin
Park City

Clean up the community

Editor:
Preserving the earth and healing it are ongoing concerns. Thanks to the Park City community for a recent cleanup … but there is much more work to do. In fact the work is never done. Next time you drive west on I-80, look at the trash on the north side caught by the fence. So you are invited to join Recycle Utah for the annual “Pride in Your Park” community cleanup event on Saturday, May 4. Volunteers should meet at various locations around town (visit recycleutah.org for details) at 9 a.m. to join a crew to pick up trash and recyclables in Park City’s parks, waterways, roadsides and fields. The cleanup will last until noon. Both trash bags and recycling bags will be provided. Volunteers are asked to bring their own gloves and reusable water bottles. Recycle Utah is happy to partner with Comcast Cares for this event. For every volunteer that helps us this day, Recycle Utah will receive money toward a grant. Thank you to Comcast for your support of Recycle Utah and keeping Park City clean! To sign up in advance, email Haley at outreach@recycleutah.org.

Jeffrey Louden
Park City

Article’s implications were incorrect

Editor:
I’m writing this letter to correct misimpressions that I believe were implied unintentionally by Angelique McNaughton’s description last week of my plea in abeyance in Summit County Justice Court. I am not disputing the accuracy of the reporter, but the implications that could be drawn have been misshaped by some. The title of the article had “hit and run” in it. The plea in abeyance was not to my car or me hitting anyone. No one was hit and no one was in danger at any time. The plea was based on my acknowledging that I disobeyed a worker directing me to back up from a closed 200-foot road. I drove down a gully along the side of the closed road and at the end of the gully I drove back up onto the open portion of the road. No one was hit or injured.

Van Greenfield
Park City


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