Letters to the Editor | ParkRecord.com

Letters to the Editor

Children's choir felt Park City's warmth

Editor:

Park Silly Sunday Market sends a very sincere thank you to a few local businesses and families that really made a difference this last Sunday. The Matsiko Children’s Choir performed their little hearts out in a chilly drizzle on the 7th Street Canyon’s Stage and, when they finished their performance, the Marriott Summit Watch presented them with warm, fluffy pool towels. The Internet Cafe invited them in to enjoy a complimentary cup of hot cocoa with a heaping mound of whipped cream. My heart was warmed when 25 children shouted "Thank You, Brian!" in unison.

The International Children’s Network planner found out the group’s previous accommodations had fallen through and reached out for some help in locating a place for the children to stay during their brief stop in Park City. The Kirsches and The Canyons Resort quickly stepped in to offer them a comfortable and very luxurious place to rest.

These children come from tiny villages in Uganda; many of them are orphans and all of their families are very grateful for the opportunity their children have to receive an education. This is the second year Park Silly has hosted the Matsiko Children’s Choir and we look forward to their visit every year. It is magic when they sing, they give so much of themselves in their performances. Their visit to Park City will be a very special memory for them on their 10-month journey around the world to rally sponsorships to help support their education. They were so appreciative and I have never been more proud of the unbounded generosity of my community.

Jewels Harrison

Visionary director

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Park Silly Sunday Market

Thanks for putting kids’ safety first

Editor:

Thanks to the Park City School Board of Education for taking action towards developing a draft policy addressing procedures for dealing with life-threatening allergies. We feel fortunate to live in a district that places such a high value on the health and safety of all of its students.

As the parents of a child with a life threatening allergy, we owe a much overdue public thank you to the many parents, students, teachers and administrators who have helped our child safely navigate through the Park City schools. No one deserves more credit than Pat Flynn, the principal of Parley’s Park Elementary School when our son attended. Pat’s efforts set a tone of compassion and tolerance that has followed our son to his current school, TMIS, where the administration and teachers are every bit as supportive. Thank you to the hundreds of families that our child has gone to school with that put his safety and well-being first.

This is yet another reminder to our family of how fortunate we are to live in such a caring, supportive and healthy community.

Carol and Dirk Beal

Park City

Day of Caring was a community effort

Editor

On behalf of United Way of Salt Lake’s Summit County Leadership Council, we want to thank our entire community for its support of the 2009 Summit County United Way Day of Caring project. We provided 87 backpacks filled with schools supplies and a special book for young learners to needy children in Park City and Summit County through schools, teachers, the Peace House, and Holy Cross Ministries.

We would like to thank the people of Summit County for their generous donations of backpacks and school supplies and to our community partners who provided drop-off sites. We would also like to thank the 20 volunteers who came to City Park to assemble the backpacks and the Park City Wal-Mart store for their generous contribution and for providing volunteers. Members of Park City Kiwanis Club were great allies and we are grateful for the support and caring of The Park Record, KPCW, and PCTV. Jessica Wall, the volunteer coordinator from the Peace House, deserves special recognition for her help.

Many thanks to everyone involved in this project. It was truly a community effort.

Nancy Tallman,

Summit County Leadership Council chair

Joy Erickson,

United Way of Salt Lake, Summit County regional director

Is this happening more than we know?

Editor:

I am writing this letter in response to an unfortunate incident which

occurred Saturday night (Sept. 12th) while my daughter was driving home from a babysitting job in Silver Springs. At approx. 11:30 p.m., while driving on Highway 224, my daughter was pulled over by a Summit County Sheriff because her license plate was not illuminated. Fair game in my opinion. However, what transpired after that is what I am calling into question.

After asking for her driver’s license and vehicle registration, the officer asked my daughter to step out of the car and proceeded to ask her if she had been drinking, as he thought he smelled alcohol in the car. "No," she replied, "I am coming home from a babysitting job." He then searched her mouth, gave her a field sobriety test (which she passed), searched her mouth AGAIN and then gave her a breathalyzer which showed no alcohol in her system.

Was it the Skull Candy stickers which covered her Subaru? Maybe it was her graduation tassel which hung from the rear-view mirror, or maybe it was the time of night that prompted this officer to put the fear of God into my daughter.

I have the utmost respect for our men and women in law enforcement and I have raised my children to respect authority as well, but what am I to think after this incident? My daughter was visibly shaken when she returned home that night and I can’t help but think how many real drunks passed the officer as he was shining the flashlight in my daughter’s eyes for all of Park City to see? Maybe this was an isolated incident of an overzealous officer, or perhaps this is something that is occurring more often than we know.

Suzanne Pretorius

Park City