Letters to the Editor | ParkRecord.com

Letters to the Editor

PR

Editor:

The Friends of the Park City Library Board has just completed another very successful Labor Day weekend used book sale. All the proceeds are donated to the library, especially useful in this time of tight budgets. A huge thank you goes out to our wonderful community for its extensive support of the sale. Businesses that donate much-needed items and let us post flyers — KPCW, Park City Television, The Park Record — as well as the many locals who register as Friends, volunteer their time and, of course, buy books, are much appreciated. We couldn’t pull it off without you.

Suzelle McCullough and Trine Nielsen

book sale co-chairs

Park City just keeps getting better

Editor:

Recommended Stories For You

In the next week the new Park City Hospital will open. We have not had the opportunity to tour the facility yet, but wow, how nice will it be to have a wonderful new health facility right here in Park City. Over the past few years we have come to appreciate life here in Park City more than I anticipated. And our expectations were high.

From the skiing to Park Silly Market to sitting in The Spur listing to the Motherload Canyon Band with our mayor playing, life is good here in Park City. This past week our neighborhood mother moose and her twins have been visiting our backyard. So they eat the foliage — a lot of it — and leave their biodegradables everywhere. Not many in the world can say they can sit out back and have these beautiful creatures eating and lounging just 25 feet away.

This weekend we noticed fall foliage beginning its annual return. We know how quickly that happens here in our community. Days are getting shorter and the evenings cooler. Pretty soon white will appear on the peaks and many of us will be thinking of our first runs down The Canyons or Park City Mountain or Deer Valley.

Are we having fun yet? Laura and I sure are and each and every day we are reminded of what a wonderful community Park City is in which to live.

Thanks, Park City!

Jim and Laura Arnold

Park City

Who will pay the price for Treasure?

Editor:

I’d like to thank The Park Record for publishing the article, "A trek through Treasure," about the site visit that took place at Treasure Hill on August 19. It was a great opportunity to find out just how much this proposed development (right in the heart of Old Town) would change the overall look and feel of all of Park City.

The article stated, "Chatter on the tour focused on the proposed buildings rather than the amount of traffic Treasure is expected to attract, which is a lingering concern for the critics who live on streets like Empire Avenue and Lowell Avenue." I’d like to point out that there are far more than just a few Old Town critics who are concerned about this project. THINC (Treasure Hill Impact Neighborhood Coalition) currently consists of over 400 concerned residents from all over Park City and the Snyderville basin.

The proposed development is just above Main Street in the Creole Gulch area but the impact would extend far beyond the neighboring streets. If built, Treasure would dramatically change the landscape that all of us would see and experience when visiting Old Town. Several of the buildings proposed are approximately 100 feet high! In some areas the trees halfway up the hillside would be destroyed. Is this what the citizens of Park City want right in the heart of Old Town?

I’d like to encourage all Park City residents to find out more about this potential massive development by visiting the developer’s website at http://www.treasureparkcity.com or THINC’s website at thincpc.wordpress.com. You can sign up on THINC’s site to receive regular updates and important meeting notices via email.

Brian Van Hecke

Park City

Brad Olch had his run as mayor

Editor:

In his response to a question about open-space programs in Wednesday’s Park Record’s Voter Guide, former Mayor Brad Olch talks about the purchase of the Osguthorpe farm and how in other dealings he did not "just roll over with the developers."

I do believe that there was a lot of controversy about an amount of over $600,000 (1998 dollars) spent on refurbishing the little white house at the back of the farm for some future use that has never happened. Think about how much open space that money could have purchased.

In relationship to the dealing with developers, wasn’t it Mr. Olch that cast the tie-breaking "Yea" vote to allow the Sweeney family to develop the Treasure Hill project that will cast blight over the entire mountain area behind Old Town?

Brad had his run as mayor and did accomplish a lot. However, I feel that with the economic times being what they are, we need someone more in touch with the average Park City "Joe and Jane" who actually have to work for a living.

Roger Strand

Park City

Climate change: Let the facts speak

Editor:

This letter is in response to the letter questioning the certainty of climate change and the purpose of the Save Our Snow event. The following facts speak clearer than the words of those who prefer to take a contrarian view to what is accepted by the vast majority of the scientific community:

The nonpartisan Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) concluded in 2007 that warming of the climate system is now "unequivocal," based on observations of increases in global average air and ocean temperatures, widespread melting of snow and ice, and rising global average sea level.

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) 2008 State of the Climate Report and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) 2008 Surface Temperature Analysis:

a.) Since the mid-1970s, the average surface temperature has warmed about 1 degree F.

b.) The Earth’s surface is currently warming at a rate of about 0.29 degrees F/decade or 2.9 degrees F/century.

c.) The eight warmest years on record (since 1880) have all occurred since 2001, with the warmest year being 2005.

Additionally, the warming trend is seen in both daily maximum and minimum temperatures, with minimum temperatures increasing at a faster rate than maximum temperatures. Widespread reductions in the number of days below freezing occurred during the latter half of the 20th century in the United States as well as most land areas of the Northern Hemisphere and areas of the Southern Hemisphere and the average temperatures in the Arctic have increased at almost twice the global rate in the past 100 years. The IPCC has concluded that most of the observed warming in global average surface temperature that has occurred since the mid-20th century is a result of human activities.

We can (and should) debate the most effective methods to counter climate change, but the time to doubt its existence is behind us.

Bob Hopper

Park City

Miners Day was the best yet

Editor:

On behalf of the Park City Rotary Club, we just wanted to thank the entire community of Park City for their support of the Miners Day celebration. With Mother Nature’s help and all the great people who

attended, this year’s event stacked up to be the most successful event we have ever sponsored. One hundred percent of the proceeds from this event go into our grants program for local nonprofit organizations. These proceeds could not have come at a more opportune time. Park City, thank you very much. We hope to see you all again next year.

Joe Rametta

Park City

A peanut ban for all local schools?

Editor:

Did you know that the PCSD Board of Education has implemented a temporary ban of all peanuts/tree nut products at Trailside Elementary? They are now putting a committee together to study the issue and then make a recommendation for a district-wide policy!

You may have seen PCSD Superintendent Ray Timothy on KSL last week. He said this decision was made on behalf of one child at TSES who has a severe allergic reaction. According to research done by parents in the last few weeks, a ban is not the best approach. Education and awareness of all allergic reactions and how to respond is a much better according to the American Medical Association. Summit Pediatrics does not support a peanut ban nor does the Anaphylactic & Allergy Network Association. I have not been able to find any doctors who support this ban. There are so many professional associations who do not recommend banning foods from schools. In fact, I can’t find a single professional association who supports a ban!

I would like to ask the school board what is Luke Weldon supposed to do? He is severely autistic and has eaten PB & J since kindergarten. He can’t transfer to a different school because that would disrupt his world even further. Routine is so key for children with autism. Are his special needs any less important?

If you would like to be included in updates and meeting times and e-mails, please me at Farbington@gmail.com.

Christie Worthington

Park City

Obama’s speech was inspiring to kids

Editor:

I am 13 years old and currently attend Treasure Mountain Middle School, and in 2 period Debate I saw President Obama’s speech.

There had been a lot of anticipation coming up to it. I heard the president would tell me Nazi-like propaganda and socialist ideas. I was not surprised when it did the opposite. Did it make me want to be a communist? Did it seem as though I was being recruited to be a U.S. socialist? No it did not. It inspired me to work harder at my studies and achieve my dreams. His speech made me take my schoolwork seriously and appreciate the country we live in. In America it takes a lot of work to become something great. President Obama helped many school kids realize this dream.

Cozy Huggins

Park City

Protecting our freedom to listen

Editor:

The Republican tactic of obstruction is teaching our children that if you don’t want someone to hear an idea you oppose, you yell and shout, rant and rave using phrases full of fear and name-calling so a conversation is not possible. They are telling our children they shouldn’t listen to both sides of an argument. Freedom of speech was the first protection afforded by the Bill of Rights. Perhaps it should have also included protection for our right to hear. Shame on anyone in education for modeling this behavior for the students of Utah to see.

President Obama’s speech was wonderful! Thank you to all educators who bravely seized the moment to teach the values of education, critical thinking and citizenship by letting their students hear the president’s speech.

Lynne Romney

Salt Lake City