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Letters to the Editor

Dense project would set bad precedent

Editor:

A proposed new development named "Stone Ridge" located in the Snyderville Basin within the Trailside and Old Ranch Road Neighborhood Planning Areas is proposing a high-density project of 250 multi-family and single family units, which is an increase in density of 1,700% over the existing zoning.

This high density project is attempting to take advantage of a recent county ordinance named "CORE" (Community Oriented Residential Enhancement) that is intended to address workforce housing needs, which we all support. The problem is that the developer has "disguised" a very high density plan that purports to add 65 workforce housing units but also includes 129 homes at 6.25 homes per acre (.16 acre each) and additional multi-family units. The developer’s proposed plan is inconsistent and incompatible with many of the stated goals, objectives and policies as set forth in the Snyderville Basin General Plan and specifically in the Trailside and Old Ranch Road Neighborhood Planning Areas and the Snyderville Basin Development Code.

It is unacceptable to see a development proposed under the Workforce Housing provision erase the Snyderville Basin’s aspirations for the future and all of the hard work that was put into the existing General Plan, the Neighborhood Plans and the Development Code that have taken place over the last 10 years. The approval of this proposed project would set a precedent for long-term excessive-growth consequences impacting the entire Snyderville Basin.

If you are interested in stating your viewpoints regarding the proposed project, it is important to show up at the Jan. 12 meeting at 6 p.m. in the Sheldon Richins building that is open to public input.

Richard Thomas

Park City

Kim Peek deserves to be remembered

Editor:

I can’t believe The Park Record online has (obituaries on) everyone from Britney Murphy and Chris Henry to James Owen Sullivan … but nothing about Kim Peek, the autistic Salt Lake City man who was the inspiration for the movie "Rain Man," who passed (Dec. 19) at age 58 from an apparent heart attack, and is survived by his family. Guess if you’re not one of the super famous you don’t rate a mention these days? Sad. Would have thought it would be here considering. That movie did more to bring an awareness of and association with autism to the general public than just about anything else in 1988 and subsequent years and in a non-negative way. He deserves to be remembered, and my condolences to his family. Know that there is one family up here who knew of the contributions Kim made and will always remember him.

Even now, if someone asks about my own son, and doesn’t know what autism is, you say, "Did you ever see Rain Man? Kind of like that" and their entire demeanor changes. You can see they have at least a basic idea at that point. One movie — one life –but it touched so many.

Jen Bailey

Kamas


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