Letters to the Editor, July 18-20, 2012 | ParkRecord.com

Letters to the Editor, July 18-20, 2012

Trying to get the right rate can be taxing

Editor:

In response to Ray Johnson’s letter in the July 14-17 issue regarding 84098 sales tax: I realized after moving here 18 years ago that when I ordered by phone from catalogs (JC Penney, Sears, Lands’ End, etc.) that I was always charged the 84060 tax rate even though my address was 84098.

On relatively small orders it wasn’t worth haggling over. However, when I ordered furniture from North Carolina, I always had to jump through hoops to get them to charge the correct tax rate. Last year, when I ordered dining-room furniture, my address was changed from Park City, UT 84098 to Snyderville Basin TR Dist, UT 84098 in order to get the 6.35% charge rather than the "city" of Park City charge of 7.45%.

Also, I frequently order online from a women’s clothing site. When I ordered several weeks ago I needed to speak with a customer service rep about something and also asked about the tax rate at the same time. My address was changed to Snyderville 84098 from Park City 84098. I still have to call them for the tax adjustment it isn’t automatic, but they do have it on record that I should be charged 6.35%. However, in checking with that same store at our Tanger Outlet stores, 84098, I am charged 7.45%. When I brought this to the attention of the store manager at the outlet, her reply was they just charged what corporate tells them to charge. She didn’t seem concerned about trying to change to the correct rate.

So, not only do we need to check the tax rate on large online orders, we need to check the stores right here in Snyderville Basin. As Mr. Johnson states, it makes a big difference on a large purchase.

Barbara Clasen

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Acknowledge your lack of planning, Allied

Editor:

So how does one get to be Allied Waste’s operations manager when the best he can do in the face of the recent chaos in trash collection is gratuitously insult his customers?

I read an article in The Park Record, a mailing from Recycle Utah, and the materials that came in the plastic bag attached to the new can. According to Allied Waste rep Gordon Brokaw, "many of the problems that residents have encountered so far could be avoided if they read the packets attached to the new bins" (Saturday’s Park Record). So, Mr. Brokaw, what is it that I should have read to better understand why my neighborhood was littered with untouched cans for a week?

Here’s an idea: Do what you say you are going to do when you say you are going to do it. If your plans don’t go as you expected, look in the mirror. There will surely be times in the future when you will wish that your customers were more understanding than we are likely to be after being blamed for your lack of planning and execution. Does Allied Waste have a PR department?

Marc Eckels

Park City

MARC sculpture money could be better spent

Editor:

I was dismayed when I read the article in last week’s Park Record regarding the expenditure of $69,000 for a sculpture of bicyclists that will be constructed in front of the new PC MARC.

I realize the funds for this "addition" to the MARC are part of an art fund and not from funds designated for the rec center itself. However, I think it’s money that could have been better spent. Since opening in January the MARC has been in a constant state of repairs. With the completion of the $8-million-plus renovation, the minimum most people expected was working equipment. The center has only four treadmills and very inadequate weight equipment. When I asked about this, I was told that, with the new fiscal year starting in July, new equipment would appear.

I am frustrated that the city found $69,000 to decorate the outside of the facility but doesn’t think the inside deserves the same kind of attention.

Carolyn Williams

Park City

Count us out of your recycling service, Allied

Editor:

This is an open letter to Allied Waste, and, yes, we sent a copy to their customer service center:

We have been residents of Summit County for 12 years and have always carefully sorted our recycling and taken it to our fine nonprofit recycler in town. While we were pleased to finally have curbside pickup offered in our neighborhood, we were furious to find out that you have been sending our recycling to the Summit County landfill. We’re disappointed that you thought this was the best solution to a "difficult transition." Your letter stated your drivers would inspect blue bins and not take them if they contained garbage. Clearly this did not happen and you instead chose the easiest option. We do not trust you and wish to opt out of your recycling service. We’ll continue to take our recycling to our friends and neighbors at Recycle Utah. Their primary concern is for the good of our community, not corporate greed and shareholder wealth. Please come pick up your blue bin at your earliest convenience and we hope you’ll make an attempt to recycle it.

Mark Saurer

Summit Park

Don’t people want more benefits, lower costs?

Editor:

I just received a check from my health insurance company. This was due to the Medical Loss Ratio. This requires insurance companies to return, to its policy holders, money when they receive better claims experience then they expected. This past year I had my lowest annual increase to my health insurance premiums than I can ever remember. Plus I am now receiving extra benefits such as regular health screenings.

So I am receiving extra benefits at lower costs. Plus the act requires everyone to contribute into the health-care system. Isn’t this fiscally responsible?

Why are so many people against this?

Larry J. Gwin

Park City

Park City opens its first interpretive trail

Editor:

It’s official. The McPolin Farm Nature Trail opened on July 9th with a ribbon-cutting ceremony attended by Heinrich Deters, Park City trails coordinator, who has been a supporter of Park City’s first interpretive trail from the start. It is a moderate unpaved trail of approximately l mile with interpretive signage of its natural features designed to appeal for use by the young, older and less athletic.

The week, preceding the opening, Charlie Sturgis, executive director of the Mountain Trails Foundation, led Boy Scout Troop 1113 of Salt Lake City on a clean-up and widening of the trail to 6 feet. Of course, our heartfelt appreciation to Charlie and also to the many who worked and supported the development of the trail and its signage now and in the past.

If anyone wishes to volunteer for trail clearing, contact the Mountain Trails Foundation. This is a good project for Scouts or other groups looking for a community project.

Jinny Vallor

Sharon Winders

McPolin Farm Nature Trail Committee

Hats off to Stein’s for hosting clinic benefit

Editor:

It WAS all about the hats! Over 100 lovely, lunching ladies donned their finest chapeaus to benefit the People’s Health Clinic at the Second Annual Silver Queen Derby. We’d like to thank our premier sponsor, Stein Eriksen Lodge, for hosting the Derby. We can’t say enough about how wonderful the Stein management and staff were to work with. I’d like to give a special shout out to Nancy Liepmann, director of event services and Sarah Myers, marketing and PR manager, as well as all our guests not even the rainy day could dampen the enthusiasm surrounding the event! It was heartwarming to see so many women enjoying Stein’s hospitality while raising funds for the Women’s Wellness program at the clinic. Local beauties modeled fashions by Farasha Boutique, adding glamour and allure to the day. Mark your calendar and join us in the winners’ circle next year as the Silver Queen Derby rides again.

Jenny Dorsey

Event director, The People’s Health Clinic