Osmonds warm up winter in Old Town | ParkRecord.com

Osmonds warm up winter in Old Town

ANNA BLOOM, Of the Record staff

The stage near La Casita just off Main Street has been cold since the summer months, and now, in the middle of December, snow clings to the venue’s a-framed roof, exaggerating its frigid state. But six Osmond legacies persevere despite the fact low temperatures freeze a few of their microphone wires. Consummate performers, they engage the audience waiting for a song at 6 p.m. on a Friday night.

"How is everyone?" Doug Osmond asks the crowd of nearly 40 huddled before him.

"Cold!" they reply.

Soon, the wires thaw and the audience stays to hear the sons of Alan Osmond, known as the Osmond 2nd Generation, warm the night with "Happy Holidays," "The Most Wonderful Time of the Year," "All I Want for Christmas Is You" and "Jingle Bell Hop." Doug and his younger brother David step off the stage to dance sometimes inviting kids to join them. Two chefs from Oishi Sushi Bar and Grill step outside to listen in their aprons. The crowd dances, warming up in the chilly corner in Old Town.

The members of the Osmond Generation, the eldest of whom is 33, sings in a range of contemporary styles from hip hop to pop and rock, but never quite depart from the original Osmond Brothers barbershop sound created by their father and their eight uncles the sound they learned by watching old videotapes in their living room.

"They started like we did — a lot of it came naturally," Alan Osmond told The Park Record. "As kids, they’d watch videos of us kids on the Andy Williams Show and they sang along with them — and in harmony with each other."

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When entertainer Bob Hope heard the young singers in the 1980s, he put them on his variety show, Alan says.

"They heard his boys sing "I Want a Girl (Just Like the Girl That Married Dear Old Dad)" the same song we sang when we were discovered in Disneyland," he explains.

So long as they were at least two years old, Alan says he let his sons join the group. The Osmond 2nd Generation has been performing for 25 years and have had three top-20 singles in England.

The Friday night Park City performance followed headline-making events for the family. Within the last two months, Marie Osmond made the news after fainting on the dance-competition reality show, "Dancing with the Stars," and George Osmond, the patriarch to the family’s original singing group passed away. George was 90, and died a day before the Osmonds were scheduled for a nationally-televised reunion on Oprah Winfrey Show the first week of November.

In spite of the loss, and Marie’s obligation to "Dancing With the Stars," members of the family arrived to speak with Winfrey, including the 2nd Generation, who also performed on the show.

"It really was a tribute to our grandpa," Tyler Osmond, 17, the youngest of the group said.

Tyler is one of George’s 55 grandchildren born to his nine sons. All told, there are 127 Osmonds, Alan said. "They needed to put bleachers on stage to hold us all," he recalled of the talk show appearance.

The original nine Osmond Brothers are slated to go on tour within a few months and plan to bring along the 2nd Generation as part of the act. "They’ve already come up through the ranks they work hard," Alan says of his sons.

Alan credits the success of the family business one that has included The Donny and Marie Show, The Osmond Foundation and now the Children’s Miracle Network, the alliance of hospitals for children to the Osmonds’ long-standing principles and faith.

"My boys are all Eagle Scouts, they’ve all been or are going to be missionaries," he says. "We all grew up with a good work ethic. We’re based on family values and that’s what our country needs right now, I think."