Park City councilor-elect wants small businesses to thrive amid corporatization | ParkRecord.com

Park City councilor-elect wants small businesses to thrive amid corporatization

Park City Mayor Andy Beerman, left, greets City Councilor-elect Max Doilney on Thursday night outside a City Council meeting at the Marsac Building. Doilney is scheduled to be sworn into office in early January and anticipates there will be upward of 80 hours of orientation prior to him taking the seat.
Jay Hamburger/Park Record

Park City Councilor-elect Max Doilney intends to weigh decisions at the Marsac Building through the lens of someone with a small business such as himself.

Doilney, the owner of Corner Store Pub & Grill and Corner Sports at the Resort Center, said in an interview after capturing the third City Council seat on the ballot on Tuesday he plans to make decisions as a city councilor after considering the potential impacts on small businesses as well as small businesses that want to open in the community. He acknowledged that the effects of decisions on larger corporations must also be considered.

He said he will encourage large developers in Park City to provide opportunities for small businesses that are locally owned to have the first chance at leasing space, as an example. Doilney described the long-anticipated redevelopment of the base areas of Park City Mountain Resort and Deer Valley Resort as possibilities for small businesses.

“I just think they should be approaching local people first,” he said, describing large corporations as having a focus on the finances of a location and a return on investment.

Doilney is 42 and lives in Prospector. He has lived in Park City nearly his entire life, leaving only for college. He is the son of a 1980s-era member of the City Council, Jim Doilney. He is scheduled to be sworn into office in early January for a four-year term.

Doilney was the third-place finisher, according to the preliminary results released on Tuesday night. His 863 votes put him solidly in the third-place slot, trailing the other winners — incumbent City Councilors Nann Worel and Becca Gerber — by more than 500 votes but beating the others on the ballot by more than 100 votes each. He also finished third in an August primary election, trailing Worel and Gerber in that balloting as well.

“I’m excited to get in and start doing the work. I’m not a huge fan of the campaign,” Doilney said.

He intends to “listen and learn a little bit” and said he wants to delve into City Hall efficiencies once he is in office. He did not provide details about whether there are inefficient policies or programs. Doilney described himself as a “jack-of-all-trades kind of person.”

Doilney anticipates there will be upward of 80 hours of orientation prior to him taking office. He said he will tour municipal buildings, meet staffers and begin understanding the mechanics of the city government. When he takes office he will “come with the right amount of insight” having completed the orientation, Doilney said.

He said he wants to learn about the waterworks system as part of preparing to take office and receive information about aging infrastructure.

“Where are we vulnerable,” he said.

Doilney after Election Day began to reflect on the idea he will be serving as an elected official in the community where he grew up. Driving home from dinner this week, after he had won the seat, he recalled where a road in Prospector once ended. He is able to look at Park City through the eyes of a young child as well as an adult, Doilney said.

“It’s still sinking in. I’m not exactly sure how it feels,” he said about winning office.


Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.