Park City crowd rallies for Black lives, continuing efforts after killing of George Floyd | ParkRecord.com
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Park City crowd rallies for Black lives, continuing efforts after killing of George Floyd

Dozens of people attended a demonstration at the Olympic Welcome Plaza on Saturday designed to show solidarity with a national movement after the death of George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis. The event also highlighted the contributions to the country by Black people.
Jay Hamburger/Park Record

An event in Park City on Saturday drew dozens of people to the Olympic Welcome Plaza to listen to speeches, learn of the contributions to the country by Black people and show solidarity with a national movement after the death of George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis.

The demonstration was peaceful as people held signs along the side of the road at the busy intersection of Park Avenue and Kearns Boulevard. Many drivers honked horns as they drove by the demonstrators. Nearly the entire crowd was white.

The Park City Police Department participated, setting up a table with information about the agency. A sign urging people to raise funds for Black lives emblazoned with a clenched fist was put on the giant tower that anchors the Olympic Welcome Plaza.

Printouts describing prominent Black Americans were posted. Some of the people highlighted included Olympic track and field champion Jesse Owens, champion boxer and activist Muhammad Ali, the civil rights activists Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X, abolitionist Frederick Douglass and Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall.

Some of the people brought signs with messages like “Black Dads Matter,” “End the reality of police brutality” and “Reform Now Reparations Now.”

In an interview, one of the organizers, Park City-area resident Emanuel Vazquez, said the event accomplished the goals of informing people about the topic.

“My message is, basically, to use whatever platform that you have, whether it’s small, whether it’s big, to kind of educate yourself, learn this information,” he said.

The printouts of the prominent Black Americans helped educate the attendees, he said.

“Black people, minorities, are part of this country and they played a significant part of it as well, in building it. And that’s what this country was made by, right, immigrants and minorities,” Vazquez said.

The event was not affiliated with Black Lives Matter but raised funds for the movement.

The gathering on Saturday followed shortly after a well-attended demonstration at Dozier Field at Park City High School in tribute to Floyd. Upward of 300 people gathered at the high school in early June to listen to speeches, kneel in silence and raise awareness.


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