Park City posts Main Street banners resembling rainbow LGBTQ pride flags | ParkRecord.com

Park City posts Main Street banners resembling rainbow LGBTQ pride flags

Park City posted banners along Main Street with a color pattern resembling the rainbow seen on pride flags associated with the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer community. They are part of City Hall’s “Love where you live” campaign and are one of three patterns that adorn the Main Street lampposts.
Jay Hamburger/Park Record

City Hall has posted banners along Main Street with a color pattern resembling the rainbow seen on pride flags associated with the LGBTQ community.

The banners are part of a wider municipal program of inclusivity and they were installed in the months after a controversy in nearby Heber City regarding pride flags that drew attention in Park City. The banners were recently put up along Main Street.

The rainbow-themed banners, which also are emblazoned with the message “Love where you live,” are one of three patterns that adorn the Main Street lampposts. One of the other designs says “Love where you live” in English while the other says the same message in Spanish. The other two have blue backgrounds.

Mayor Andy Beerman in his State of the City address in February announced the “Love where you live” initiative, saying at the time the effort would cover a range of issues. The announcement was made alongside other topics like a planned expansion of the infrastructure for electric vehicles and the creation of a resident advocate post at City Hall.

The banners with the message written in Spanish are an acknowledgment of the large Spanish-speaking population of Park City. The rainbow-themed banners, though, are especially noteworthy in a community that has long been seen as one of the state’s most welcoming places for the LGBTQ community. Park City has hosted a gay ski week for years and there once was a Queer Lounge that opened for the annual Sundance Film Festival.

The banners are flying less than two months after the Park City Council declared June as Pride Month. The elected officials that month adopted a resolution declaring Park City “has a dedicated history” of promoting equality and opportunities for members of the LGBTQ community. The mayor in June called Park City a tolerant community as he spoke in favor of Pride Month in the community.

They also appeared in the months after a widely publicized controversy in Heber City regarding the display of pride flags. The Heber City controversy did not involve Park City, but leaders in Park City noted the issue in the Wasatch County seat as they made the Pride Month declaration in June. The Park City resolution was at least partially inspired by the controversy in Heber City.

The banners, meanwhile, fit with City Hall’s social equity efforts, which are designed to ensure the broad spectrum of Parkites are welcomed in the community. The social equity programs are wide ranging and include the Spanish speakers of Park City.

Park City regularly rotates the banners along Main Street to mark the seasons or special events. It is not clear how long the rainbow-themed banners or the others associated with the “Love where you live” initiative will be on display. It seems City Hall could regularly post the “Love where you live” banners in between those marking special events since they offer such a broad message.

There are occasionally actual rainbow flags flown on private property along Main Street, typically on just a few buildings, to mark gay ski week.


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