Park City readies for tone-setting Treasure meetings | ParkRecord.com

Park City readies for tone-setting Treasure meetings

The Park City Planning Commission, a panel that has spent more than a decade considering the Treasure development proposal with a series of stops and starts, on Wednesday is scheduled to receive a briefing about possibilities for the hillside land should the project be reimagined as a smaller proposal.

The panel is not expected to dwell on details since a redone application has not been submitted, but Planning Commissioners on Wednesday could provide some insight to their thinking about a development. The Park City Council the next day is poised to discuss Treasure as well during a meeting that will include members of the Planning Commission. The two gatherings could set a tone as the sides press ahead with the Treasure talks in 2018.

The Treasure proposal the Planning Commission tabled earlier in December involved upward of 1 million square feet while a reimagined project would be greatly reduced in scope and include a boutique hotel and houses. A redone project hinges on Park City voters in 2018 approving a $24 million ballot measure to acquire a 50 percent stake in Treasure. If the ballot measure fails, the project would be expected to return to the Planning Commission in a slightly reduced form.

Bruce Erickson, the planning director at City Hall, said the Treasure side on Wednesday is expected to present initial ideas for a development that is half the size of the one that was under consideration before it was tabled.

"It is important. It is the beginning," Erickson said.

The Planning Commission had deep-rooted concern about Treasure, spending extensive time on issues like the traffic the project would generate on streets like Lowell Avenue and Empire Avenue, the size of the buildings and the excavation that would be needed. It is unknown what sort of issues may arise with a reimagined project, but it seems likely the panel would dwell on topics like traffic and the designs regardless of the size of a project.

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The negotiations between City Hall and the Treasure partnership that led to the agreement calling for a ballot measure and a reimagined project were held in closed Park City Council sessions in recent weeks. Erickson, though, said it is critical that the talks about a project itself be done in public.

"If we go behind closed door and negotiate this, we haven't served the public in this particular case," he said.

The Treasure partnership currently consists of the Sweeney family and a firm called Park City II, LLC. If the ballot measure passes, City Hall would acquire the Sweeney family's 50 percent stake, leaving Park City II, LLC to pursue a reimagined project.

The Planning Commission meeting is scheduled to start at 5:30 p.m. in the City Council chambers at the Marsac Building. Public input will be taken. The Planning Commission on Thursday, meanwhile, is scheduled to meet with Mayor Jack Thomas and the City Council to discuss Treasure. The City Council meeting is scheduled to start at 3:45 p.m. at the Marsac Building with the Treasure discussion slated to begin 15 minutes later. Two hours have been set aside to address topics regarding alternative plans for the Treasure land, including the height and access. Public input will also be taken at the City Council meeting. Park City II, LLC representatives are anticipated to attend both of the meetings.