Park City readies to craft stand on UDOT’s ideas for S.R. 248 | ParkRecord.com

Park City readies to craft stand on UDOT’s ideas for S.R. 248

S.R. 248 at the intersection with S.R. 224 is one of the busiest spots in Park City as traffic backs up regularly during the ski season and during rush hour all year. The Utah Department of Transportation has outlined an idea to expand the road. A public-comment period closes this week.
Tanzi Propst/Park Record

Park City leaders on Thursday are expected to discuss the Utah Department of Transportation’s idea to expand S.R. 248 along the entryway and start to craft an official statement regarding the controversial concept, an important step for Mayor Andy Beerman and the Park City Council but one that does not appear will result in a statement until after a UDOT-imposed deadline for public comments.

The elected officials are scheduled to take public testimony at the meeting on Thursday and provide input to staffers regarding the S.R. 248 idea. The staffers would return to the mayor and City Council on July 18 with a resolution for their consideration. The July 18 resolution’s language would reflect the opinions that are expressed at the meeting on Thursday. The text of a resolution would be expected to be released prior to the July 18 meeting, perhaps next Monday or Tuesday.

It has been expected that the mayor and the City Council would craft an official position for state transportation officials, but it was not clear until the release of the agenda for the meeting on Thursday what form it would take. A resolution like the one that would be considered on July 18 would provide the municipal government a formal position requiring a majority vote of the City Council, something that could carry more clout than another form of input such as a letter signed by the mayor. The timing, though, puts the potential adoption of a resolution well after the UDOT deadline.

Beerman in an interview said the elected officials want to explain to state transportation officials the municipal government’s transit priorities “as opposed to trying to build our way” out of the traffic issues along S.R. 248.

“I think it’s very important. It’s very timely,” the mayor said about an official position.

The meeting on Thursday is scheduled on the same day as the UDOT deadline for public comments. The 30-day public comment period ends at midnight on Thursday. The concept for S.R. 248 outlined by state transportation officials has encountered broad resistance in the community as critics seize on a variety of issues such as the prospects of increased traffic and the impacts of cuts on PC Hill to expand the state highway.

The state Department of Transportation has based the designs of an expansion of S.R. 248 from the U.S. 40 interchange to the intersection with S.R. 224 on the projected traffic increases, saying intersections would fail if there are not improvements to the road by 2040. The concept calls for the expansion of the state highway to five lanes between the U.S. 40 interchange and the intersection with S.R. 224. The current road ranges from three lanes to five lanes along the stretch. The five-lane alternative calls for two lanes in each direction with a turning lane at most of the intersections. There would be two left-turn lanes at the intersections with S.R. 224 and Bonanza Drive.

There are fears in Park City that an expanded S.R. 248 entryway would lead to additional traffic and higher speeds. Some also claim the concept does not jibe with City Hall’s traffic-fighting transit goals.

The meeting on Thursday is scheduled to start at 6 p.m. in the City Council chambers at the Marsac Building.

More information is available on the project website: udot.utah.gov/SR248improved.

The 30-day public-comment period ends at midnight on Thursday. Comments may be submitted via an online form, udot.utah.gov/SR248improved/#comment-section, or via email to sr248improved@utah.gov.

They can also be mailed to:

Lochner c/o SR-248 EA

3995 South 700 East, Suite 450

Salt Lake City, UT

84107


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