Park City teen who stood with Trump stands with the president amid impeachment | ParkRecord.com

Park City teen who stood with Trump stands with the president amid impeachment

Ryan Zink, a Park City High School student, spoke at a Turning Point USA event in Washington, D.C. this summer, after being summoned to the stage by President Trump.
Screenshot courtesy of the White House via YouTube

Park City teen Ryan Zink stood on stage with President Trump in July.

And as the president is impeached, Zink still stands with him.

Zink, 16 and a Park City High School student who lives in Trailside, is the leader of the school’s chapter of the conservative group Turning Point USA. He was briefly thrust into the national political discussion in April after the intentional release of pepper spray at the high school in an effort to stop the group from holding an event.

The president made public remarks about the release of pepper spray in Park City with Zink in attendance. Zink shared the stage with Trump in Washington, addressing a conservative audience alongside the president.

In an interview after the House of Representatives impeached Trump, Zink criticized the move as shutting off Republican voices and lacking a clear-cut case.

“I think it’s just ridiculous. There’s no solid, solid evidence,” Zink said, adding that the impeachment is based “solely” on the Democrats not agreeing with Trump’s stands on issues.

Zink appeared with Trump moments after the president spoke about the release of pepper spray at the high school, an extraordinarily rare presidential mention of a Park City event or issue. Trump said a “leftist released pepper spray into a high school auditorium” and told the crowd people required medical attention afterward. Trump also said Zink might have a future in politics.

Zink said in an interview he would tell the president to continue with his agenda amid the impeachment if he was to talk to Trump again.

“I would say just cancel out all the noise. Keep doing what you’re doing,” Zink said.

Zink predicted the president will be reelected in the 2020 campaign. The impeachment will not change many opinions about Trump during the campaign, he said. Zink also said the impeachment will motivate Republican voters in 2020.

“This is just enraging — how they can get away with something like this,” Zink said.

It did not appear the impeachment of Trump immediately caused a stir in Park City beyond the historic nature of the vote by the House of Representatives. It seems likely the community is split along partisan lines although the Park City area has long leaned Democratic. Each of the members of the Summit County Council is a Democrat. Park City elected offices are nonpartisan, but the mayor and the members of the Park City Council exhibit many Democratic tendencies.

The Park Record was unable to contact the leader of the Summit County Republican Party for comment.

The chair of the Summit County Democratic Party, Meredith Reed, praised the House of Representatives after the impeachment vote, saying it “was a good day for democracy.” She said her “sense of it” holds that Summit County Democrats and most of the political independents support the impeachment of Trump.

She said, though, the focus of the county Democrats remains on local and state-level politics as the party prepares for the elections in 2020. Increasing the number of Democratic state legislators is a priority, she said.

Reed hopes Trump is removed from office, but she said a conviction by the Senate is unlikely.

“He has put his personal gain ahead of the good of the country,” she said.


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