City continues parking integration with Go Park City | ParkRecord.com

City continues parking integration with Go Park City

A new Go Park City meter stands watch on Main Street on Wednesday, Nov. 22.

Nothing's perfect, whether it's the quality of an overconfident younger cousin's mashed potatoes or solutions to Main Street parking. However, Park City parking supervisor Kenzie Coulson thinks that the overhaul of downtown parking, which began in October, has gone pretty well so far.

"That process went smoothly," Coulson said. "We saw a couple of little glitches during our first week but nothing that really was substantial enough to affect anyone's experience too much."

People who have visited downtown during the offseason have likely already noticed the changes in place, but the project will finish on Dec. 15, just in time for the holiday season.

The changes underway to Old Town parking are largely electronic in nature. New parking meters accept payment via a smartphone app as well as credit cards, and the China Bridge garage is getting a facelift. Enforcement procedures are changing as well.

Smart meters

The new parking meters along Main Street, which came online on Oct. 9, accept payment via card and the Go Park City parking app. Starting Dec. 15, parking on Main Street will go for $2 an hour. Both Sandridge lots are still free.

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Creating a profile on the app, available through the iPhone App Store and the Google Play Store, allows for a faster parking process once a visitor to Main Street has found a spot. Molly Pellegrini, a Newport Beach, California, resident and second-home owner in Park City, said she thinks the new meters are easier to operate.

"Once you get it initially set up, it's easy," Pellegrini said. "This is easier if you'll just take the time to set it up."

The Go Park City app requires the user's payment information and vehicle information before parking. An ongoing screen displays the meter information and time left on the parking session, and a push notification is sent when time is about to run out. Sessions can be extended in-app so that no one has to leave the dinner table to put an extra quarter in the meter.

If visitors don't want to bother with parking at all, the app also includes a link to Park City's transit information.

Impending China Bridge changes

Coulson said while changes to the China Bridge parking garage aren't yet fully implemented, the whole-floor closures that have been impeding traffic inside the building have ceased.

"We have a few bollards to amend and some concrete work to amend but … very isolated," Coulson said. "There is a bit more signage to go into place before we launch as well, but again those are isolated construction events that won't involve any more closures."

Changes on the way for the garage, located on Swede Alley, include aesthetic improvements like a brighter paint job, as well as electronic signs that give information about the space situation inside of the garage.

Payment kiosks for the scheduled implementation of pay parking in the garage are in place. Starting on Dec. 15, people parking in the garage will have to pay for parking after 5 p.m. at a rate of $3 an hour. Information regarding rates and enforcement can be found at http://www.parkcity.org/departments/parking/parking-strategies-plan.