Dog bite reported in newly created off-leash area in Park City | ParkRecord.com

Dog bite reported in newly created off-leash area in Park City

Jay Hamburger THE PARK RECORD

A sign informs people they are about to enter Round Valley, an area that City Hall has declared an off-leash area for dogs. A dog bite was reported in the Round Valley off-leash area on Jan. 19. Jake Shane/Park Record

A dog bit a woman in one of Park City’s newly designated off-leash areas, the first such reported case in a place where dogs are allowed to be off leashes, Summit County Animal Control said.

The Park City Police Department received the report at 1:47 p.m. on Jan. 19 and then referred the case to Animal Control. It was four days after the opening of the off-leash areas in Round Valley and part of the field outside the Park City Library.

The bite was reported in the Round Valley off-leash area. The dog did not break the victim’s skin, the police said.

An Animal Control officer spoke to the victim a Park Meadows woman — over the phone. According to Animal Control, she was cross-country skiing on a trail off the Meadows Drive trailhead.

"Dog saw her, got excited, chased her," said Frank Root, an Animal Control officer.

The woman put her hand up in a defensive position before the dog bit her gloved hand, he said. The bite tore the glove but did not break the skin, Root said.

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A man with the dog, presumed by Animal Control to be the owner, refused to provide information to the woman and left the scene, Root said. The woman reported the incident hours afterward.

Root said the dog is likely a poodle mix with white and brown fur. The man with the dog appeared to be between his mid-40s and early-50s. He has salt-and-pepper hair and wore a red jacket, Root said.

The incident occurred four days after Park City opened two off-leash areas following a Park City Council decision in favor of the off-leash designations. One of the areas the site of the incident covers approximately 1,400 acres of municipal land in Round Valley. The other entails half of the library field.

The elected officials, though, required that dogs in the off-leash areas remain under what is known as voice and sight control. Dogs are also prohibited from attacking people in the off-leash areas, and they are not allowed to chase people, other dogs or wildlife.

Round Valley has long been a popular place for people to bring their dogs off leash, a practice that was prohibited prior to the creation of the off-leash area.