Park City Mountain Resort’s next steps unclear after lift upgrade refused | ParkRecord.com
YOUR AD HERE »

Park City Mountain Resort’s next steps unclear after lift upgrade refused

Representatives decline to comment on whether paid parking will still be introduced

Park City Mountain Resort in the spring outlined an intention to introduce a paid-parking system in the upcoming ski season ahead of a proposal to upgrade its lift network, but it’s unclear if the measure will still be implemented during the 2022-2023 ski season following a Park City Planning Commission vote against the lift project last week.
David Jackson/Park Record

Park City Mountain Resort in the spring outlined an intention to introduce a paid-parking system in the upcoming ski season after a tumultuous winter and ahead of a proposal to upgrade its lift network, but it’s unclear if the measure will still be implemented during the 2022-2023 ski season following a vote against the lift project last week.

PCMR representatives declined to comment in response to Park Record inquiries into next steps or whether the paid-parking system is still part of the resort’s plan for the upcoming ski season. The resort announced the new traffic-fighting measure in part because of last winter’s big crowds and long lines, but it was also publicized amid early talks with City Hall about the proposed upgrades to the Eagle and Silverlode Express lifts.

Those opposed to the work say the increased capacity would cause more traffic on the Park City side of the resort, which is where paid parking would be implemented in the original plan. The Canyons Village side of PCMR would remain free.



The Park City residents who filed an appeal against the lift project argued the city’s Planning Department should have never approved the administrative conditional-use permit because of inadequate parking mitigation and peak ski day planning.

Mike Goar, who until recently was the chief operating officer at PCMR and remains at parent company Vail Resorts in a different role, said during recent hearings the resort’s lift plan exceeded the Planning Department’s 19 conditions of approval. The list would have required PCMR to use net proceeds from paid parking to reinvest in transit, transportation and parking measures to combat traffic problems at the resort and nearby neighborhoods as well as manage a parking reservation system with an on-site attendant, adopt a turn-away and tow policy for people without a reservation and designate a residential liaison to meet with City Hall.



But with the Planning Commission’s vote to grant the appeal, thereby rejecting the proposal, PCMR won’t comment on if the system designed to counter traffic and reduce the demand for parking next ski season will still be implemented after decades of free lots at the base area.

The resort initially said there would be paid parking every day until 1 p.m. of the ski season, although the fee hasn’t been published, and drivers would be required to secure a spot ahead of time. The plan included incentives for drivers who carpool.

A consultant retained by the resort predicted a possible 11% decrease in parking demand if PCMR charges $25 per day. The figure is similar to other Vail Resorts properties where a paid-parking system was introduced.

Sara Huey, the senior manager of communications at PCMR, provided The Park Record with a previously prepared statement released after last week’s Planning Commission decision in response to this week’s questions about paid parking.

“After months of work with City leadership and staff, we had a comprehensive plan for next season which included two lift upgrades and a parking mitigation plan. Following [the June 15] disjointed decision, we are considering how to move forward in light of the misalignment between the City and its Planning Commission,” the statement said.


Support Local Journalism

Support Local Journalism

Readers around Park City and Summit County make the Park Record's work possible. Your financial contribution supports our efforts to deliver quality, locally relevant journalism.

Now more than ever, your support is critical to help us keep our community informed about the evolving coronavirus pandemic and the impact it is having locally. Every contribution, however large or small, will make a difference.

Each donation will be used exclusively for the development and creation of increased news coverage.