Park City police officers pull over drivers traveling at well above posted speed limits | ParkRecord.com
YOUR AD HERE »

Park City police officers pull over drivers traveling at well above posted speed limits

Traffic stops logged on the entryways, some at 60 mph or faster, agency reports

A mobile electronic message board on Monday on S.R. 224 warns drivers about wildlife on the state highway that serves as one of Park City’s entry corridors. Speeding and wildlife collisions are closely related issues. The Park City Police Department in recent days stopped a series of drivers well above the posted speed limits, including cases on S.R. 224.
Tanzi Propst/Park Record

The Park City Police Department in recent days has pulled over a series of vehicles, claiming the drivers were speeding at clips well above the posted limits.

The traffic stops in the last week were reported at a time when the Park City-area tourism industry has appeared to be solid as the community draws people amid the continued spread of the novel coronavirus. The Police Department generally is busier at crowded times although traffic cases like stops for speeding are logged at a regular clip throughout the year.

In some of the cases last week, the vehicle was traveling at a speed at least 10 mph above the posted limit.



Public police logs in many of the cases did not provide details about whether the drivers received warnings or tickets. The police typically issue warnings unless the person is found to be a repeat offender or if a speeding case is an egregious offense.

The police on Saturday patrolled the entryways at certain times. A police officer pulled over a driver on S.R. 224 at 11:38 a.m. that day after clocking the vehicle on radar at 61 mph in a location where the posted speed limit is 45 mph. Earlier that day, at 6:04 a.m., a driver was stopped at 60 mph in a location where the posted speed limit is 35 mph at or close to the intersection of Kearns Boulevard and Comstock Drive. Another speeding case was reported at 1:19 a.m., when the police said a driver was stopped at 50 mph in a location where the posted speed limit is 35 mph in the vicinity of the intersection of S.R. 224 and Holiday Ranch Loop Road.



Some of the other cases reported last week included:

• on Sunday, Feb. 21 at 7:42 a.m., a police officer pulled over a driver on S.R. 248, indicting a speed radar clocked the vehicle at 52 mph in a location where the posted speed limit is 35 mph.

• on Friday, Feb. 19 at 2:49 p.m., a driver was stopped on Royal Street after an officer clocked the vehicle on radar at 40 mph in a location where the posted speed limit is 25 mph. The traffic stop was reported shortly after an officer indicated they were conducting enforcement on Royal Street in an effort to “increase officer presence in the area and deter traffic violations,” according to the police.

• on Feb. 19 at 1:07 p.m., the police stopped a driver on S.R. 224 after the vehicle was clocked at 60 mph in a location where the posted speed limit is 45 mph.

• on Feb. 19 at 11:55 a.m., the police stopped a driver after the vehicle was clocked on radar at 61 mph in a location where the posted speed limit is 45 mph on S.R. 224.

• on Thursday, Feb. 18 at 10:14 p.m., the police stopped a driver at or close to the intersection of S.R. 224 and Payday Drive, indicating the vehicle was traveling at 63 mph in a location where the posted speed limit is 45 mph.

• on Feb. 18 at 2:22 p.m., a police officer pulled over a driver after the vehicle was clocked at 40 mph in a location where the posted speed limit is 25 mph. The vehicle was at or close to the intersection of Deer Valley Drive and Mellow Mountain Road.

Speeding has long been one of the top law enforcement complaints of people who live in Park City, with concerns including the possibility of crashes and collisions with wildlife. There are worries about speeding on the entryways as well as on neighborhood streets. The Police Department regularly conducts traffic patrols and takes other steps like placing digital signs that display a vehicle’s speed as it drives by.


Support Local Journalism

Support Local Journalism

Readers around Park City and Summit County make the Park Record's work possible. Your financial contribution supports our efforts to deliver quality, locally relevant journalism.

Now more than ever, your support is critical to help us keep our community informed about the evolving coronavirus pandemic and the impact it is having locally. Every contribution, however large or small, will make a difference.

Each donation will be used exclusively for the development and creation of increased news coverage.