Study planned to map route around Park City traffic | ParkRecord.com

Study planned to map route around Park City traffic

Park City officials want options to deal with transportation and parking issues in an important swath of the city.

And that could mean aerial routes and rail links in addition to bus lines.

City Hall on Monday posted an advertisement seeking a consultant to assist with efforts centered on Bonanza Park, the lower Park Avenue corridor and the Park City Mountain Resort area. The advertisement was posted shortly after a Park City Council discussion last week about the topic.

The advertisement mentions aerial, rail and rubber tire, or vehicle, possibilities. It wants the consultant to "determine most attractive, efficient and effective mode to serve City needs."

Some of the topics officials want a consultant to study include:

  • places for visitors to PCMR to park capable of handling the busiest days
  • transit, pedestrian and bicyclist routes linking Main Street, PCMR, the lower Park Avenue corridor and Bonanza Park.
  • remote parking meant for special events and busy days on Main Street
  • economic development at PCMR and in Bonanza Park

    "It is broad, and it is purposely so," said Brooks Robinson, the senior transportation planner at City Hall.

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    Robinson said the study is anticipated to be completed by the end of October. Officials received approximately 12 requests for information about the study within hours of the posting. The interest came from firms in Utah and from outside the state, he said.

    "The danger of doing it piecemeal is you take a track with one particular project," Robinson said, explaining that doing so could create an issue elsewhere.

    Robinson said one of the details a consultant would be expected to research is whether PCMR is the best location for a transit hub that would involve funding from City Hall. Park City officials and the former owners of PCMR were in discussions about a hub and parking garage at the resort. It is not clear whether Vail Resorts, which acquired PCMR in 2014, will pursue the same sort of project.

    Mayor Jack Thomas and the Park City Council discussed a study at a recent meeting, providing encouraging comments as staffers readied to post the advertisement.

    "Think big," City Councilor Cindy Matsumoto said, adding that she wants the issues solved.

    Andy Beerman, another City Councilor, said the study is needed and mentioned that the regional efforts known as Mountain Accord are also underway.

    Kent Cashel, who is City Hall’s transportation planning director, said during the meeting staffers are "thinking creatively." He provided an example, saying that someone who thinks creatively could consider building a parking garage and then putting a golf driving range atop the structure.

    In a report to the elected officials in anticipation of the recent meeting, staffers outlined a wide range of topics that a study will address. They include the development potential of the PCMR base area, the Treasure development rights, the lower Park Avenue corridor, Bonanza Park and a park-and-ride lot at Richardson Flat along the S.R. 248 entryway.

    Other topics will include the S.R. 224 and S.R. 248 entryways, Bonanza Drive, Silver King Drive and Empire Avenue, the report says.

    The report alludes to several ideas that could draw attention if they are pursued. They include an analysis of "legal requirements for use of Rail Trail as a trail-transportation corridor." Another phrase, mentioned in a section about possible sites for a transit center and parking structure, includes "Municipal Golf Course, particularly the Driving Range." Other locations listed in the section include City Park and the Olympic Welcome Plaza.