Treasure tallied thousands of cars in 2005 traffic count | ParkRecord.com

Treasure tallied thousands of cars in 2005 traffic count

Study this weekend will look at many of the same locations

The Treasure developers in 2005 conducted a traffic study similar in nature to the one that is planned on Saturday afternoon.

The study in 2005 involved the same day – the Saturday of the busy Presidents Day weekend – and most of the same locations as the one that is slated this weekend. The study in 2005 involved counts in the morning and afternoon, 8 a.m. until 10 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. until 5:30 p.m., while the study on Saturday is set for the afternoon and early evening. The hours on Saturday are planned from 3 p.m. until 6 p.m.

The numbers collected in 2005 show the total number of vehicles counted at an intersection over the course of one hour at the traffic peak. The figures were outlined in a two-page April 2005 memo to the Park City engineer at the time.

Some of the figures included:

  • 2,302 vehicles were counted in the morning at the intersection of Park Avenue and Deer Valley Drive while 3,503 were tallied in the afternoon.
  • 314 vehicles were counted in the morning at the intersection of Deer Valley Drive and Silver King Drive while 438 were tallied in the afternoon.
  • 188 vehicles were counted in the morning at the intersection of Empire Avenue and Shadow Ridge Road while 303 were tallied in the afternoon.
  • 120 vehicles were counted in the morning at the intersection of Empire Avenue and Manor Way while 190 were tallied in the afternoon.
  • 82 vehicles were counted in the morning at the intersection of Lowell Avenue and Shadow Ridge Road while 101 were tallied in the afternoon.

    The numbers were lower in each instance than the projected figures, according to the report, and in some cases the tallies were significantly lower than what was projected.

    The figures tallied on Saturday will likely be higher than the earlier ones as a result of significant growth in the Park City area as well as growth in the tourism industry in the intervening years.