Parkite coaches everything but sports | ParkRecord.com

Parkite coaches everything but sports

Dan Bischoff, Of the Record staff

Success is an ambiguous term.

For some, it means earning truckloads of cash. For others, it’s strengthening relationships, excelling in athletics, developing a fulfilling career or freedom to stay at home.

Often, however, obtaining individual success is difficult without help.

"If someone can say they can do it on their own, I would say congratulations," said Angie Marks, a certified life coach who runs Life on Purpose. "The most successful people in life have had assistance somewhere."

Marks counsels people and provides extra motivation and understanding they need to achieve their potential. Her system works in both business and personal lives.

"People want to make a change in their life, to make a difference and raise the bar in their life or business," Marks said.

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For more than 19 years, she used a degree in psychology to work in the human development field. For a time she worked as a counselor. The philosophy behind the trade turned her off.

"It was very discouraging, it was depressing," Marks said. "I didn’t feel like I was making a difference in life because we were constantly looking over our shoulder to a dreary past."

When she discovered an opportunity to be a life coach, she found something that was a refreshing alternative.

"Coaching is different than therapy," Marks said. "A consultant gives you advice and a therapist delves into past problems."

Coaching starts where the individual person is and helps map out where the individual wants to end up. It never gets into what happened in the person’s past, but moves on and starts with a fresh approach.

"That’s why I got into coaching versus going back into counseling," Marks said. "I consider my clients creatively resourceful and naturally whole, where therapy looks at people as being broken and needing to be fixed."

As Marks found a way to better her life, she hopes she can help others as well.

"My goal is to help people with their performance and quality of life," she said. "I got into this because you only get one chance to live. You don’t get a choice on how to die but you have a choice on how to live.

"We live in such a fast pace world and its constantly changing, people are living in compromise and to pay the bills. My purpose is to help them live a purposeful life."

She graduated from the Coaches Training Institute based out of San Francisco and is certified through the International Coach Federation.

She developed a reputation in Scottsdale, Ariz. Where there are "hundred of coaches" who are part of a billion dollar industry, she said. Marks was taken aback when she moved to Park City last summer and found only 18 coaches in the state.

"It’s such an affluent place in Park City," Marks said, "but when I tell them what I do, people ask me, ‘What sport do I coach?’"

While she doesn’t coach sports, she sees a parallel to athletics.

"A professional athlete would not even consider going through their sport without a coach," Marks said. "Why wouldn’t someone in life?"

Aaron Green, a mortgage banker in Arizona credits much of his success to Marks’ coaching. He said he was making money but he wasn’t satisfied with his life’s direction.

Green says he’s neither a "cheesy person" nor a "rah-rah-rah" guy, but the time he spent with Marks in the last year has enabled him pinpoint areas where he excelled and helped him develop a plan to get where he wanted to go.

"The greatest thing for me, was helping me to recognize things about myself," Green said.

Green admits that money is not his top goal. For him, it’s the quality if life, health goals and relationships with friends and family.

"If you look at it from an objective standpoint, from the way society views you, I might be less successful now," Green said. "But I now know exactly where I’m going and I’m on the course towards that. I’m moving down that path. Before I was managing and getting a big salary and I determined that’s not the life I want so I opened my own business."

Jennifer Tolifson sells motorcycle parts for an Arizona company called Tucker Rocky.

"I’m a female in a man’s world," Tolifson said.

Tolifson credits Marks for more than doubling her sales because of her success.

"It has done nothing but positive things for my life," Tolifson said. "My business has tripled, she has kept me accountable for every goal. She’s part of my vehicle, I can’t imagine doing anything without her."

Tolifson doesn’t only consult with Marks about her career, however.

"She’s helped me with my personal life as well," Tolifson said. "She ties it all in, it’s really, super cool."

Tolifson says there are things that she can’t recognize or analyze about herself the way someone else can. Having a coach helps her stay on track to meet goals as Marks helps her focus on "the now" and "maximizing your life for the future," she said.

"She’s outside the box looking in," Tolifson said, "She may see things you don’t. She’s there to help you take that leap and she keeps you accountable.

"In some respects, she’s my greatest fan. She helps guide you to get right back on the path again. She helps me see that."

Tolifson still receives guidance from Marks on the telephone, but she’s envious of Parkites.

"She’s awesome, I’m so sad she moved to (Park City). I’m sad she can’t meet me for coffee to pump me up."

Marks has her own life coach and has similar feelings toward that person. She was working 60 hours a week and leaving her kids with a nanny before she started having sessions with her coach.

"It’s made me, I have got a clear focus on what my values are," Marks said. "Who I am as a person is important to me. I wanted to do something that I could still be a mom.

"I wanted to be in touch with the greatness of what I can offer the world. It has also given me a better perspective," Marks continued.

Marks said many people go through life thinking they have only one choice. She tries to inspire them to grab reachable dreams.

"I do things because I want to do them, not what the world thinks I should do," Marks said. "It’s made a huge difference in my life all the way around; it’s given me more balance."

Each life coach has a niche, Marks said. Hers involves personal life and executive coaching. Whether it’s business or life success, Marks customizes her services depending on what the client needs.

"I consider myself a master in questioning and inquiry with my clients and understanding what their purpose is and what they’re looking to get out of life," Marks said. "It’s always more than what they’re putting out. I consider myself a master in assisting people in having a more fulfilling life."

The more a person knows how he or she operates, "the more empowered you are in life," Marks said.

Marks will be holding a workshop Feb. 7 and 21 at the Marriott Mountainside for managers regarding skills in coaching and leadership. For more information on life coaching or the seminars, call 658-5788.