Police power, courtesy of the sun Park Avenue facility will be outfitted with a solar array | ParkRecord.com

Police power, courtesy of the sun Park Avenue facility will be outfitted with a solar array

Jay Hamburger The Park Record

A solar array will be installed atop the Park Avenue police station this summer, the fourth municipal building that will have a power-generating array on the roof.

The Park City Council recently authorized staffers to sign a contract up to $113,500 for the installation. A Woods Cross firm called Intermountain Wind and Solar won the contract. A Rocky Mountain Power grant through the company’s Blue Sky program and leftover money from an earlier federal grant will fund the solar array.

Tyler Poulson, who manages City Hall’s environmental programs, said he hopes the array at the police station is operational by Aug. 10. Eighty-eight panels will be installed. They are each approximately 5 ½ feet long and 3 1/4 feet wide. The panels will be put on a rack system about two feet above the roof surface. Poulson said the array will not be highly visible from the street level.

The solar panels are expected to generate approximately 34,000 kilowatt-hours of power each year roughly 10 percent of the power used at the police station annually.

City Hall previously installed solar arrays on the Marsac Building, the Park City Ice Arena and the restroom building at Creekside Park. The Snow Creek Cottages development also is outfitted with solar arrays. The municipal government built the cottages and then sold them as work force housing. The building that houses the Park City Museum, which is owned by City Hall but under a long-term lease, features a solar array, too.

Poulson said there are plans to install a solar array at the Public Works Department as well.

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The solar installations are part of City Hall’s wide-ranging environmental programs. Park City leaders have taken numerous steps to reduce emissions, saying that a warming planet could someday threaten the ski industry that is critical to the area’s economy.

The station opened in 2007 and replaced the Police Department’s cramped quarters in the Marsac Building. There are a series of environmental features and designs in the building, including a system that relies on the Earth’s internal energy to heat and cool the facility.