South Summit High School graduates reflect before stepping forward | ParkRecord.com

South Summit High School graduates reflect before stepping forward

As Amy Lair sat with her friends on the gym floor, waiting for teachers to call them over to line up, part of her was relieved that the school year was almost over. Along with other class officers, she had spent months planning senior dances, dinners, campouts and the all-night party that was scheduled for that evening.

But another part knew that she was going to miss her classmates and South Summit High School after they tossed their caps into the air.

"I haven't cried yet but I probably will," she said.

Many of her peers shared similar sentiments as they prepared to walk across the football field in their white and green graduation gowns and take a seat as students of the school for the last time. The commencement ceremony for South Summit High School's class of 2018 took place on Thursday.

The graduates were eager to look forward at their futures, but many of them also took time to reminiscence about their time in school. During the ceremony, Lair, Lydia Farmer and Mylee Snyder read "class memories," which were stories about their classmates they collected from kindergarten to senior year.

Kaitlyn Adair, who gave the first student speech, said that each of the students had impacted each other during their time in school, which she said not to forget.

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"We all became a part of each other's books," she said. "These last 12 years have been one of our longest and most important chapters in our lives. We have learned, changed and accomplished. We have become who we are with the help of each other."

Farmer and Lair said that they would miss their class, which they said was diverse in its interests but discovered commonalities.

"We have so many different personalities but we find a way to still love each other," Lair said before the ceremony.

Montana Descamps, another student, said that he felt "a little bit of everything" about graduating.

"It's a big, new start and a big change," he said. "I'm excited to leave but feeling weird that the majority of these kids I'm probably going to never see again."

He plans to attend college and pursue a degree in biology.

Wade Woolstenhulme, principal of the high school, has watched many of the students change and mature over time. He was the majority of the graduates' principal during both their middle and high school years.

He told the graduates during the ceremony that he was proud of what they had accomplished because he knew how far some of them had come. He advised them to strive to do what is best and to have courage for what is ahead.

Alexia Daugaard, who plans to study clinical psychology at Southern Utah University, said that she is a little scared to face what is to come because she knows that there are a lot of decisions that she will need to make in the next couple of years.

"It's a huge change, and I'm mostly excited," she said.

But Woolstenhulme also said that it is "all right to fail," a theme that was repeated throughout the ceremony. Speakers Emely Arauz and Isaac Henry touched on that message as they spoke.

"Don't make the mistake of living someone else's life," Arauz said.