High Valley Transit receives $25 million federal grant | ParkRecord.com
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High Valley Transit receives $25 million federal grant

The money will be used to help fund the S.R. 224 project

Summit County and High Valley Transit received a $25 million federal grant to help fund the S.R. 224 electric bus and bus rapid transit project. The award was through the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Rebuilding American Infrastructure with Sustainability and Equity (RAISE) program.
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Summit County and High Valley Transit were awarded a $25 million federal grant to help fund an essential infrastructure project.

The money, which will allow work on the S.R. 224 electric bus and bus rapid transit project to continue, was secured through the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Rebuilding American Infrastructure with Sustainability and Equity (RAISE) program.

“High Valley Transit is thrilled and honored by the news that HVT and Summit County received the RAISE grant for Bus Rapid Transit and electric buses,” Kim Carson, chair of the High Valley Transit board, said in a prepared statement. “This was our fifth application for this very competitive Federal grant, and we wouldn’t be here if it weren’t for the hard work of our Executive Director, Caroline Rodriguez, her staff, and many others.” 



The $25 million awarded to the county and High Valley Transit is the largest amount available through the RAISE program. Grants are awarded to projects that address the program’s goals of modernizing transportation and increasing safety across the country, making it more affordable and strengthening supply chains.

High Valley Transit officials said the electric bus rapid transit system would do just that by creating accessible, low-emission transport for residents who need it.



“It will transform S.R. 224 into the operational backbone of Summit County’s transit services,” the transit service said in a statement.

The estimated $50 million construction project will create designated public transportation lanes in each direction from Kimball Junction to Kearns Boulevard. School buses, transit and emergency vehicles will have exclusive access to the lanes, allowing the vehicles to navigate traffic with fewer stops.

The federal grant, paired with an additional $30 million promised by the State of Utah, will also help High Valley Transit build two new transit stations, upgrade three existing facilities and improve operations along the S.R. 224 corridor. The remaining money will be used to purchase five battery-powered buses and the electric charging infrastructure needed to support the vehicles. 

“Many thanks to the Utah Congressional Delegation, especially Congressman Blake Moore, as well as the Utah Transportation Commission for their continued support of this project,” Summit County Council Chair Chris Robinson said in a prepared statement. “This award elevates attention to our small, rural transit system to a national level and acknowledges the innovative approaches we’re employing to move people across the Wasatch Back.”

The project will undergo an environment review in September and is expected to enter the final design phase in early 2023.


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