Project ABC plans to unveil ideas to support the arts | ParkRecord.com

Project ABC plans to unveil ideas to support the arts

The cultural planning group Project ABC is scheduled to host three open houses throughout Summit County over the next several weeks. The open houses will reveal what the group has been working on for the last year surrounding the arts and culture sector.

Summit County has a robust arts and culture sector that has been flourishing for decades without any real focus or planning to coordinate the efforts, according to Hadley Dynak, executive director of the Park City Summit County Arts Council.

A community driven multi- planning effort known as Project ABC (Art, Beauty and Culture) was created last May to come up with a plan for supporting arts and culture in the county. The year-long planning process has included data collection, convening and documentation, Dynak said.

Project ABC is ready to roll out the ideas that were prioritized throughout the planning process at three open houses scheduled to be held over the next several weeks throughout the county.

"The open houses are the last phase of community engagement," Dynak said. "As a wrap up, we want to share the things that we have learned and get some last-minute feedback and thoughts on implementation."

The open houses are scheduled to be held: Tuesday, Feb. 27, from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Coalville Library; Tuesday, March 6, between 5 and 7 p.m. at the South Summit County Services Building; and Thursday, March 8, from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Park City Library.

Jake McIntire, project management consultant for Project ABC, said cultural planning is intended to gain a better grasp on what the broad needs are countywide for the arts and culture sector.

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"What are the needs of local artists, nonprofits and creative businesses, and how can art and culture grow into becoming a true staple of the community?" he said. "Cultural planning is understanding those things to get to a more ideal future. Where is arts and culture and what does it mean?"

The open houses are designed to help the community understand what those concepts mean, while serving as a platform to bring people together around the established priorities, McIntire said. Anyone can attend.

Since May, Project ABC has engaged different stakeholders throughout the county and distributed surveys to various groups to collect data about what people "love and want to see moving forward," Dynak said. Some of that data was presented to the community in November.

"We wanted to understand the needs, wants, desires and dreams of the creative sector to place us in good position for sustained vitality and growth," she said.

The next step, Dynak said, will be to determine how to begin implementing the cultural plan. Stakeholders, steering committee members and a number of Summit County businesses, nonprofits and individual donors have financially contributed to the effort, including Summit County.

"We really see arts and culture as a tool to help us accomplish our community priorities," she said. "This is part of the fabric of our community and is not intended as a project to draw away from other priorities. Instead, it is about how we connect them together as we are thinking about things such as public spaces and housing. How does this help us accomplish those goals, while building vitality moving forward?"

For more information about Project ABC, go to https://www.projectabcsc.com/.