Stuart Miller makes first court appearance to face automobile homicide charges | ParkRecord.com

Stuart Miller makes first court appearance to face automobile homicide charges

The driver accused of having a blood alcohol level more than three times over the legal limit when he killed a Park City woman in a wrong-way crash last week made an initial appearance in court Monday morning.

Stuart Riley Miller, age 30, of Kamas, appeared in Summit County’s 3rd District Court on Monday after being formally charged last week. Miller faces one count of automobile homicide, a second-degree felony, and open container in a vehicle, a Class C misdemeanor. Automobile homicide, which is the most serious charge, is punishable upon conviction by one to 15 years in prison and a $10,000 fine.

On Monday, March 28, Miller entered the westbound lanes of Interstate 80 going east at a high rate of speed and crashed into a Saturn Vue, driven by Amanda K. Streit, 39, of Park City. Streit was pronounced deceased at the scene. A blood test conducted by Park City Medical Center revealed Miller had a blood-alcohol concentration of .279 grams per deciliter of blood. The legal limit is .08.

Family members of the victim appeared in court holding a picture of Streit and showing it to those in the courtroom. Streit’s stepmother was escorted out of the courtroom while sobbing after the hearing.

On Friday, Miller retained Justin Pratt, a partner with Intermountain Legal in Salt Lake City, as his attorney. Miller is currently being held on $50,000 cash-only bail in the Summit County Jail. He is scheduled to appear in court again at 8:30 a.m. Monday, April 18.

"This case is in the very early stages," Pratt said in an email to The Park Record. "My understanding is that the investigation is ongoing. I am working closely with the prosecutor, Mr. Ryan Stack, to get all the information we need to move forward with this case."

While addressing Judge Paige Petersen, Pratt raised some concerns about Miller’s ability to be treated for diabetes while in custody. Pratt suggested Miller has been forgetting conversations the two have had because of low glucose levels. In an interview with The Park Record, Pratt declined to comment any further on Miller’s health.

Ryan Stack, Summit County prosecutor, said there is "quite a bit of information to go through at this point."

"Information is still coming in and there are currently no conversations taking place about a plea bargain," Stack said.

A preliminary search of the Utah court records did not reveal a prior record.


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