The 2019 Park City Council Voter Guide | ParkRecord.com

The 2019 Park City Council Voter Guide

Candidates address issues like traffic, affordable housing and open space preservation

Park Record file photo.
Tanzi Propst/Park Record

With Election Day approaching on Nov. 5, and mail-in ballots on their way to residents, The Park Record asked the six candidates vying for three seats on the Park City Council to answer a series of questions in their own words in order to help voters make informed decisions. Below are the questions and their responses.


Please describe your background and why you want to serve on the Park City Council.

Ed Parigian
I hold a BS Accounting and MBA Entrepreneurial Enterprise.  I’ve held positions of Treasurer, Controller, Consultant, and Auditor, in Boston.  I lived in Portland, OR for 10 years while working at Nike as the Pricing Manager for a $1B category.  I’ve now lived in PC for over 13 years, happily semi-retired, tho busier than ever.  I still have to work to pay the bills, and I rent the Old Town home I’ve lived in all these years.

My mind is not constrained within any defined box.  I see a need and I fill it, and I thrive when they say “it can’t be done”.  I have always been “green”, and never been “rich”.  I know what it’s like to work from paycheck to paycheck, and it isn’t fun.

I consider myself a healthy combination of idealist, pragmatist and realist.  I can understand both sides of any story, and I’m not beholden to anybody, so I can make decisions solely based on what the community needs and wants.  I have effectively been training for this job for 13 years, as I have become more involved within the community.  I am ready to offer innovative, forward-thinking solutions to the challenges facing us.

Deanna Rhodes
Park City only works when it works for everyone. We need to reevaluate how we engage our neighbors so that we are responsive to our community’s changing needs. As a former seasonal worker at Park City Mountain, working in the service industry at No Name Saloon and Starbucks and through my nonprofit experience with Park City Community Foundation and now as executive director of CONNECT Summit County, I have a unique perspective that includes a diverse makeup of all the people who make this community special. I’m running for City Council because there is a disconnect between the working people of our community and leadership.

Many of our most substantial problems in Park City require regional collaboration. As a community organizer, I have been developing my skillset in building relationships along the Wasatch Back. In college, I graduated with a degree in political science, and I interned for a state legislature. In 2017, I volunteered to coordinate transportation for a major traffic event, Park City Women’s March. Since then, I have spent my free time working as a citizen advocate at the state legislature on issues that affect Utahns. I am passionate about solving Park City’s most pressing problems.

Max Doilney
I learned to walk in Park Meadows, swim at The Racket Club (The MARC), read at Parleys Park Elementary School (where the students and teachers are the rule: Parleys School song in the 80’s), ski at Park City Ski Area, ride everything on wheels and build friendships in Park City. I have been a substitute teacher in every school in the school district. I worked at the golf course, landscaped quarry mountain, tuned skis and served food on Main Street. For the last two decades I have owned and operated local centric businesses in Park City and now I am raising my children here. Finally I want to give back to the town that is in my soul by serving on The City Council. I have the perspective that will help Park City move forward with the lessons of the past and an eye for the future.

Becca Gerber
I was lucky that my parents chose to raise me and my brothers in Park City, with great access to the outdoors, supportive teachers and coaches, safe places to play, and a caring and connected community.

After graduating from the University of Utah, I taught skiing, worked in coffee shops,took care of kids, worked for non-profits, and did whatever I could to live here. I worked hard and met wonderful people. I found community in my friends and co-workers, and spent as much time as I could with them outdoors, riding my bike, hiking, and skiing.

I have worked my way up and created a great life here. I have an amazing husband whoowns a small, local business, Red Bicycle Breadworks, and we have an awesome little boy. I work for Aloha Ski and Snowboard Rentals in marketing and am grateful to work in the ski industry and on Main Street.

I am running for reelection because I love my community and my home, and because Ibring a background and perspective that is underrepresented. It has been an honor to serve Park City and I hope I have earned your vote for a second term.

Nann Worel
When I moved to Park City in 2007, I fell in love with this amazing community. I became the Executive Director of the Peopleʼs Health Clinic in 2008 and served in that role for 8 years. I was appointed to the Park City Planning Commission in 2011 and served there (including 2 years as Chair) until I was sworn onto Park City Council in 2016. I am a member of Park City Rotary and graduated with Leadership Park City Class 15.

Being a member of the Park City Council for the last 4 years has been an honor and a privilege. I have gained an in-depth knowledge of the workings of the City and served as the liaison from the Council to over 15 different Boards, organizations and task forces. Another 4 years on the City Council would allow me to continue the work I have started on many projects. As Vision 2020 is completed early next year, I would like to be involved in setting the course for the city based on the findings. Finally, I would appreciate the opportunity to continue to engage with all residents to find solutions to the challenges facing us.

Daniel Lewis
Candidate did not submit an answer.

Parkites, commuters and visitors continue to complain about traffic headaches across Park City even after City Hall has taken ambitious steps to reduce traffic, such as significantly expanding the bus routes. Please propose one new citywide traffic-fighting measure you pledge to present to the mayor and rest of the City Council should you win a seat. Please also identify the alternative mode of transportation that you see as most promising for Park City.

Ed Parigian
FIRST STEP: Park City, Summit & Wasatch Counties, alongside UDOT, need to commit to fashioning a detailed, reality-based regional transportation plan, looking out 30+ years.

The entry corridors, SR224 & SR248, need immediate attention.  If predictions hold, we are looking at increasing pressure on these roadways.  We need to look at both short-term “triage” and long-term “cures”.  Widening the roads should be a last resort, after we have exhausted ALL other efforts.  Sadly, UDOT predicts that, even with widening, the traffic on SR248 will revert to current levels in 20 years.  We need another solution.  We need to change behavior.

Short-term recommendations:

• Build an accessible “park and ride” lot at the SR248/SR40 junction.
• Establish a reversible Bus/HOV lane down the middle of SR248 with 15-min bus frequency.
• Establish more frequent bus service to/from Heber.
• Establish a City/Corporate incentive plan for employees using alternative transportation or carpooling.

Deanna Rhodes
One problem that is contributing to traffic is single car ridership. To encourage behavior change, we must provide a reasonable alternative. We need to consider a regional transit service connecting major centers. I propose that we utilize Richardson Flat as a desirable year-round park-and-ride with extended hours, public bathrooms, and operational emergency callboxes. An Electric Xpress bus to Main Street needs to come frequently with a dedicated transit-only lane that bypasses congestion and makes transit more reliable.

Carpooling is an alternative form of transportation, which would reduce the impact on the environment and alleviate our traffic problems. I propose a citywide incentive program to encourage employees to minimize drive-alone trips. In large cities with traffic problems like D.C. and San Francisco, instant carpooling has organically emerged. To empower skiers to connect easily for shared rides, I’d create destination signage at Richardson Flat so that people could ride into town together.

Max Doilney
I think it is naive to think City Hall has not considered every transportation solution possible for Park City’s growing traffic problems. The issue is not whether the city has been presented solutions, it lies in the willingness of the community to accept changing behaviors to adopt those solutions. More car-pooling, park and ride lots outside town, public transportation as a primary means (the once a week trip to main street on the bus is not primary means).  I believe we have a responsibility to enact solutions and the community has a responsibility to see the greater good in those changes. Without this collaboration we will continue to see more traffic and hear more complaining about it.

Becca Gerber
Traffic continues to be one of the issues that most affects the quality of our residents’ lives. There is no one thing we can do to reduce traffic. We need multiple solutions to meet the needs of our locals, our commuting workforce, and our visitors. I believe that people do not use the bus because our routes are inconvenient and indirect. If reelected, I will propose a massive reroute of our bus lines, creating shorter, more direct lines that will get people to their destinations more quickly.

In addition, while many locals support our transit system, I have heard from many residents who are not currently served by the bus line that they would like transit opportunities in their neighborhoods. While a traditional bus may not be a great fit for some of our neighborhoods, we should re-investigate smaller and more efficient microtransit opportunities.

Nann Worel
I believe it is time to focus more attention at the neighborhood level. I constantly hear from residents about speeding and increased traffic on residential streets yet they are unsure where to start to initiate change. I propose that we make the existing Neighborhood Traffic Management Program more accessible and user friendly for the community. Residents have great suggestions for improvement in their neighborhoods so letʼs tap into that wisdom for creative solutions. Letʼs also make it easier for residents to share complaints and concerns regarding traffic in their neighborhoods with City staff.

We need to be thinking 20-30 years in the future as we address traffic congestion on our already failing roads. Letʼs think “outside the box” and explore opportunities to add aerial transportation to take traffic off of our roadways.

Daniel Lewis
Candidate did not submit an answer.


City Hall’s open space efforts date back decades, leading to the recent acquisitions of Bonanza Flat and Treasure. They are the two most expensive conservation deals in Park City’s history and have left little remaining funding for further acquisitions. Do you envision an aggressive open space program continuing through the next City Council term? If so, please identify what sorts of land should be targeted and how deals should be funded. If not, why should City Hall scale back the program?

Ed Parigian
Parkites treasure our open space, no question about it.  In addition to the obvious recreational opportunities, open space offers protection from commercial development, outsized 2nd homes, and traffic.  Despite the large sum involved, we voted 78% in favor of acquiring Treasure Hill to protect us from a colossal development looming right over Old Town.  Parkites get it.

All of our large open space purchases (McPolin Farm, Round Valley, Bonanza Flat, Treasure Hill) have had both recreational and protective motivations.  Even the Library Field, for which I led the successful effort to preserve forever, was once envisioned as a Convention Center, and most recently as housing.

That being said, I think large open space purchases are behind us for a bit.  I would always entertain open space land deals that the locals support, but I think we will be concentrating on smaller spaces, within our budget, for the foreseeable future.

Deanna Rhodes
We can thank those who came before us to start the trend of protecting open space. It was incredibly forward-thinking for our town to embrace. Our community’s needs have shifted, and now we need to evolve along with them. What I propose is that we proactively address the planning and zoning codes so that they support our values and protect us from future developments.

Max Doilney
Open Space is critical to the lifestyle we love in Park City. I believe we can achieve Infinite Sum Growth with a public-private partnership founded in land entitlement trading. When land is to be developed, open space needs to be dedicated to offset the growth. Park City has an opportunity to change the relationship between development and conservation from one of a contentious nature to a partnership that benefits our citizens. Far be it from me to decide what land is most important, that is a community decision and I am all ears.

Becca Gerber
I am proud that, through the combined efforts of the City, our local non-profits and the community at large, we have purchased and preserved Treasure, Bonanza Flat, and Snow Ranch pastures in the last four years. Because of this progress, there is little land left that the City is currently interested in purchasing. Should an unforeseen opportunity arise to add valued open space, I would suggest that we bring it back to the voters and let the community decide.

Nann Worel
I do not envision an aggressive open space program in the next four years. The major parcels within City limits have been preserved and now itʼs time to step back and take a breath. The community has approved the spending of an incredible amount of money to preserve Bonanza Flat, Treasure Hill and the Armstrong parcel since I have been on the Council. Iʼm hearing loud and clear from residents that itʼs time to stop the spending. Every time we pass a bond and add to tax bills, it affects the ability of many residents with middle to lower incomes and those on fixed incomes to remain in their homes and in the City.

Daniel Lewis
Candidate did not submit an answer.


City Hall is pursuing an aggressive housing program with the goal of adding 800 units priced at affordable or attainable levels by the end of 2026. Do you agree with the 800-unit goal? If so, please identify one location where you would propose a City Hall housing development that is not already under consideration and outline your preferred target income range for municipal projects. If not, why should City Hall abandon the goal?

Ed Parigian
I support the City’s goal.  Locals living and working within the community add vitality and socio-economic diversity, reduced traffic in the corridors, and steady customers for our local businesses.  I favor a 70/30 mix of rentals and units for purchase, available to locals with incomes ranging from 60% to 150% of AMI.  I advocate including seniors in these plans.

A highlight of my Council tenure would be to work with Vail to develop their lot at the corner of Bonanza & Munchkin.  We can add up to 100 units of attainable and/or workforce housing in a central location, adjacent to public transit and all necessary services.  Combined with the housing envisioned for the Arts District, we have an incredible opportunity to create a village in that area.  PC needs workforce housing, and Vail has promised it.  I will push hard for Vail to achieve a win-win solution on this property.

Deanna Rhodes
City Hall absolutely needs to address affordable housing. As stated, the goal implies building 800 units in an area where that is an incredibly expensive endeavor. A more efficient way to address this challenge is to encourage innovative solutions to create the needed affordable housing for our community.

One problem that we have in Park City regarding housing is that we have a lot of empty houses. Efforts that I would like to see considered is a City-Sponsored long-term house sitting program, which matches qualified renters with unoccupied homes on a voluntary basis, changing the codes on parking to allow for affordable dwelling units on properties that are within a quarter-mile of a year-round bus stop, incentivize converting to deed-restriction at property transaction and creation of a fund designated specifically for affordable housing for when prices drop.

Max Doilney
I strongly support the goal of 800 units! City Hall has considered every piece of dirt in the Park City limits. Income ranges are a percentage of AMI (Area Median Income), as they are developers cannot make affordable developments pencil. As a part of the form based code debates of 2014-2016, I participated in discussions regarding code changes to NOMA district.  Cost effective redevelopment was the goal.  It failed.  Current zoning and process restrictions hamper affordable housing efforts. If we were willing to adjust some restrictions in the code (with public support of course) and avoid the NIMBY problem we continue to run into we can reach our goal. I would propose development of rent controlled housing and more single occupancy units. Rental units will help us keep real people living and working here without the burden of having to purchase outside of their comfort zone.

Becca Gerber
The goal of 800 units is based on maintaining 15% off our workforce living in town. 15% is actually a pretty modest goal. As a liaison to the Colorado Association of Ski Towns, I’ve collaborated with resort communities in WY, ID and CO who are working to serve a much higher percentage of the community workforce i.e., from 40-60%. It is important to have a measurable goal and strive to achieve it.

Two of the areas slated for upcoming housing projects were not even on the radar a few years ago—the Homestake Parcel and the Arts and Culture District. The City took advantage of these unforeseen opportunities and they will now become cornerstones of our housing program. Our best opportunities will be in the redevelopment of parcels around town and I would like to see us build rentals, targeting those with incomes 80% of AMI and below.

Nann Worel
I support the current Council goal of 800 units but am not convinced all 800 can or should be built within City limits. In talking with residents, I am frequently asked to STOP GROWTH! To many people, growth equals increased density, traffic and further loss of our sense of community. Given the high cost of land and construction in Park City, it is difficult for the City or private developers to make affordable/attainable projects make sense financially without a significant subsidy from taxpayers. Letʼs explore the opportunities available to deed restrict some existing housing stock and turn it into affordable/attainable rentals. I also favor a regional approach which works with surrounding jurisdictions to create affordable/attainable housing that is on public transit routes and connected to the community in a variety of ways.

Daniel Lewis
Candidate did not submit an answer.


There continues to be a sense of community uneasiness with the consolidation in the ski industry, including the effects of the corporate ownership of Park City Mountain Resort by Vail Resorts and Deer Valley Resort by Alterra Mountain Company. Please discuss what you see as the benefits of the corporate ownership as well as any of your concerns. Please describe the relationship you envision between the municipal government and the resort ownership and how you would build that sort of relationship.

Ed Parigian
At this point, I have mostly concerns for their long-term effect on the community.  Let there be no doubt, these entities have a lot of money, and are willing to spend it to advance their long-term goal of maximizing profit to satisfy their shareholders.  From the start, Vail showed its agenda by calling themselves Park City instead of Park City Mountain, attempting to trademark our name, putting up misleading signs, etc.  Only our concerted action reversed all those attempts.

In their drive to attract more customers, Vail and Alterra have exacerbated many issues, while failing to bring forth, nor fund, any concrete solutions.  We need to work together with them to allow for win-win outcomes as they expand their vertical reach into the city’s infrastructure.  We need them to step up and become leaders in the city.  We need “real” partnerships with them for all of us to peacefully co-exist.

Deanna Rhodes
One of the biggest advantages of consolidation of the ski resorts is the ability to have a more consistent winter season. It has also contributed to year-round tourism, which reduces the economic uncertainty that comes with resort communities. The municipal government needs to do a better job of requiring the resorts to report on their efforts to house their seasonal employees. A goal needs to be mutually set and publically reported to the community. We are in this together. A joint solution between our municipal government and the resorts could be the catalyst for positive change as long as the right guardrails exist.

Max Doilney
I have a unique relationship with the corporate influences currently spreading their wings in Park City. Owning a business in the plaza at Park City Mountain I have noticed a significant change in the flow to the ski season, blackout days, closing Scott’s Bowl (which was basically my sand box as a kid), no extension to a season with plenty of snow. Their priority is clearly the bottom line; locals are WAY down the list. Non Profit donations and the occasional local friendly day can’t make up for the cookie cutter feel that provides dependable ROI and reduced risk for shareholders. If there is pressure the city can put on these corporations to remember we built this town and we intend to keep it, I will be looking for it.

Becca Gerber
Corporate ownership of the resorts has provided them with additional capital for improvements on the mountain and stability during bad snow years. I appreciate their investments in our local non-profits. That said, large corporations are beholden to their boards and investors, which are not local. The decisions they make to improve their company may not improve the community.

The relationship between the City and all of our businesses should be one of mutual respect and transparency. Keeping open lines of communication and making an effort to seek feedback on and input for decisions that will affect either party is imperative.

Nann Worel
It is exciting that both resorts are committed to sustainable practices consistent with the current Councilʼs goals. The financial resources they bring will ensure our resorts are state of the art. I believe Park City Municipal must have a synergistic relationship with our resort partners. We must recognize that the authenticity of Park City is a key factor in the overall experience of resort visitors and those visitors benefit us economically. A challenge for the Council is to mitigate the impacts of our many visitors on the residents. The key words are “partner” and “relationship”—both must be built on mutual trust and holding one another accountable. This is especially true as both resorts exercise their development rights in their parking lots. My experience on the Planning Commission will be invaluable as development applications are presented.

Daniel Lewis
Candidate did not submit an answer.


Please differentiate yourself from your competitors.

Ed Parigian
I don’t settle for the status quo, I think both short and long-term, and I’m constantly thinking of ideas and solutions that produce win-win outcomes.  It’s what I have done all my life.  A good challenge brings out the passion in me, and we face many challenges right now.  I am competitive by nature…and I really hate to fail.  I have won awards for innovation, become a ranked tennis player, and graduated with high honors.  I want to combine all my skills, education, and experiences to confront the challenges ahead.

In this campaign, I have presented concrete ideas and plans to support my viewpoints.  We want more affordable housing, I have a plan to do it faster and better.  We want higher paying jobs in town, I have ideas to bring them in.  I have been observing, digesting, and discussing the issues we face for over 13 years.  I am ready for this.

I also have great respect for the local characters who have contributed so much to Park City over the years.  I want to carry that passion forward.  It is in their honor that I run for City Council.  Thank you for your consideration, my website is edforparkcity.com.

Deanna Rhodes
Because Park City has an economy based on hospitality and service; all of our employees are essential. I’m different than the other candidates because I am that person. I live in a studio in Prospector. I have juggled three jobs to make enough money to allow me to live in 84060. I have worked at the resorts and worked a closing shift on Main Street to turn around and open on Park Avenue.

With an already full plate to make ends meet, I have contributed to our community. I participated in the Police Citizen Academy and graduated from Leadership Park City. I’ve volunteered my time with the Sundance Film Festival. I encouraged others to run for office, and I’ve supported their campaigns. I have served on the Summit County Public Arts Advisory Council and currently serve on the Park City Police Complaint Review Committee and the Summit County Recreation Arts and Parks Tax Advisory Committee and Park City Community Foundation’s Women’s Giving Fund.

I’m running for City Council because we need a community that works for all of us. When Parkites cast their votes, they should remember that I am the candidate who works for everyone.

Max Doilney
I own and operate two small businesses in the heart of Park City. Employing over 60 people provides me a perspective few public servants have. My family has a legacy of service to the community, my father was on council in the 80’s, we set up the Excellent Educator Awards over 15 years ago to support public education in Park City, and I worked as a substitute teacher in the Park City School District. I have proven I am willing to put personal interests aside for the betterment of Park City, walking the walk to back up the talk.  If you liked Park City when you got here, I was here and I liked it then too. From a personal, educational, and business perspective I am the candidate who has put it all on the line to maintain the Park City you loved then, now, and into the future!  #Vote4Max

Becca Gerber
I ran in 2015 in hopes of bringing an under-represented voice to the Council. I worked diligently to educate myself about the issues. I attended Council meetings for over a year before I was elected. Even with all of this preparation, I was overwhelmed with information my first months.

I have learned immensely over the past four years. I have learned about budgets andtaxes, about water, transit, and historic preservation, about housing, bonding, and RDA’s, and much more. And I continue to learn with every Council and community meeting.

My term on Council has been incredibly rewarding and challenging and we have accomplished so much as community. Personally, I also got married, had a baby, and was fortunately able to act as caretaker for my mother as she battled cancer.

I look to bring my history, these new perspectives, and my four years of Council experience to a second term, to continue advocating for those who work hard to keep our town running, for families, for seniors, for skiers, for bikers, for our diverse communities, and for all of those who call Park City home. I have worked hard for this community and I ask for your vote.

Nann Worel
As a seasoned hospital administrator and only candidate with experience as a long term nonprofit Executive Director, I have experience in creating and managing budgets, the art of collaboration, understanding the needs of different cultures and building bridges. I have developed strong relationships within the nonprofit community as well as with members of the Summit County Council. I am the only candidate with Planning Commission experience (5 1/2 years/2 years as Chair) so I understand the Land Management Code and General Plan and the implications they have as our resort partners exercise their development rights. As a Planning Commissioner, I helped write the General Plan. During my first term on the City Council, I earned a reputation for being accessible, listening, doing my homework and taking positive action on issues important to our residents. I humbly ask for your vote on November 5.

Daniel Lewis
Candidate did not submit an answer.


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