Tiny art in a massive show at J GO | ParkRecord.com

Tiny art in a massive show at J GO

The J GO Gallery held its first Massively Small Show last November.

The exhibit featured works that measured no bigger than 15 inches by 15 inches created by J GO artists.

Although more than 20 artists submitted their pint-sized works, the attendance was sparse, so gallery owner Jude Grenney decided to move the date to July 27, for the second annual Massively Small Show.

"We decided the last one didn’t get enough eyeballs, because we did it during the fall," Grenney said. "We didn’t want to switch the show to the middle of the winter, because we have other pieces that need to be displayed then. So, we decided to time it a little differently in order for more people to see it."

Grenney said the little concept has big potential, because it makes artwork more accessible to most people.

"The show is designed for those who don’t have (a lot) of money to buy a large piece of work, (but can afford) to buy a collection of smaller works that they can put on partial walls and little niches in their homes or offices."

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Although last year’s show wasn’t the draw Grenney hoped, she did like what she saw in the art.

"We found with the last show that the works from almost all of the artists translated well to the smaller pieces," she said. "We didn’t think that would be possible and we were pleasantly surprised.

"It’s an unusual concept and it’s hard to push artists to paint in a small format, because most will prefer to paint big," Grenney said. "Most artists think the amount of work that goes into a small piece is just as much as what goes into a big piece. So, the choice for them is to paint bigger because the work amount is justified."

Grenney, herself, likes the look of smaller-art groupings.

"It’s the same feeling I get when I see a whole show by one artist," she said. "I enjoy seeing something on a massive scale with a similar thread, and in this case the thread is the size of the works."

Like last year, there will be approximately 20 artists participating in the upcoming show.

"They are artists who we have worked with in the past," Grenney explained. "We don’t have any international artists involved this year, but we have a couple from Park City and most of the others are from the West and work with contemporary western themes.

"We told the artists they can create works that measure up to 15 inches by 15 inches, but a lot prefer to paint in a 12-by-12 format, and some have submitted works that measure 14-by-14 or 11-by-nine."

The initial idea was to show at least a pair of works by one artist.

"However, since some of them are in such demand, we’ll only be able to show one work for some," Grenney said.

Once the Massively Small Show idea catches on, J GO will develop more ideas within the concept.

"We would like the show to become a national and juried call for artists to introduce new artwork to our audience," Grenney said. "It will also allow us to look at new art and gauge clients’ reactions to the works when we are considering new artists into the gallery."

Grenney would like to see the idea take on a life of its own.

"We would love to have an additional website and even offer some limited editions at a different price point, but for now, we’re working on getting more people to come see the show."

The J GO Gallery, 408 Main Street, will hold its second annual Massively Small Show on Friday, July 27, from 6 p.m. until 9 p.m. during the Park City Art Gallery Association’s monthly gallery stroll. The event will feature refreshments and libations. Admission is free. For more information, visit http://www.jgogallery.com.