Letters: Park City’s bus routes need reworking | ParkRecord.com

Letters: Park City’s bus routes need reworking

Bus routes on wrong path
Editor:

We have lived in Park City for eight years. Two years in Bear Hollow, and we now live in Silver Springs.

Moved here and became familiar with the bus route. Used the pink and brown routes daily. Chose our home in Silver Springs because it was two houses away from a bus stop.

Approximately two years ago we heard on KPCW a transportation expert was coming to town to improve our bus system. We were so excited. Unfortunately, we have been repeatedly disappointed.

The brown bus has been illuminated in our area, the pink bus route has been completely destroyed. The white will not stop because it's express. Last time we took the pink/transfer/white bus route to go to Main Street we ended up waiting at our neighborhood stop for 12 minutes, at the Canyons for 10 more minutes and finally arrived on the white bus 45 minutes later — this is 5-7 miles. That is the last time I will go in cold weather. It was freezing conditions. Took 45 minutes to get to Main Street. Ridiculous! Our son always took pink to PCMR. He will no longer take the bus system to the resort. Instead he begs for a ride or doesn't go. Same complaint, too long and too cold.

Once a family of six that all used bus system, now none use it.

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Very disappointing!

Please put it back the way it was or align the arrivals/departures. With Park City growing and good transportation options decreasing, it's creating endless traffic issues.

Please bring back the PINK route.

Renee Miller
Park City

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Good riddance
Editor:

To those Park City guests who Mr. Malone and Mr. Doilney fear will no longer visit Park City because of Utah's more restrictive DUI law, I say, "Good riddance." Last year, nearly 11,000 people were killed in the U.S. in accidents involving drunk drivers. How much fear still pervades our society because of the 3,000 innocent souls killed in the 9/11 attacks? How much money do we spend trying to prevent further attacks? And yet how little is our concern for the nearly 175,000 equally innocent people who have been killed, and hundreds of thousands more maimed, in drunk driving accidents since 2001? Shame on anyone who puts their own material benefit above the safety of our fellow residents and visitors.

Eric Garen
Park City

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Growing threat on Park City's roads
Editor:

I would like to thank Mr. Furr for his letter concerning the lack of adherence and enforcement of our traffic laws in Park City. A week does not go by without witnessing red lights or stop signs being ignored. I live on a street that has a posted speed limit of 20 mph. The police departments own data shows that over 75 percent of the traffic exceeds the speed limit, often by as much as twice the posted speed limit. The pleas of numerous residents for additional signage or removable speed tables over at least the last six years, to both the city and the police, are met with "limited resources available." On my street residents have resorted to posting signs asking drivers to slow down for children, pedestrians, bikers, etc. Stopped at any light along S.R. 224, including in front of the Police Department, gives you a front row seat to car, trucks and buses accelerating through the red light as vehicles begin to enter the intersection. Tragedy is not a question of if, but when. I would like to ask Mr. Denke how many crashes, injuries or fatalities are required before the city takes the necessary steps to literally put the brakes on the growing threat from drivers who choose to ignore the traffic laws in Park City.

Stan Rodman
Park City

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Institute is a needed resource
Editor:

Holy Cross Ministries is an agency that works to promote the healthy and joyful growth of children and families in the Park City community. We want to express support and gratitude for the Park City Institute. It is clear that the Institute has the health of the community in its vision and programs for it. In this day and age when it is so important to interact, to listen, to discuss and to be alive to the world of ideas, the Park City Institute, under Teri Orr and staff, seek programs that amplify and respond to topics essential to personal and communal growth, and recognizes that much of our imagination and growth comes from exposure to the arts. When this comes together, in for instance, "Beautiful Boy" or excellent journalism on the part of interviewer Doug Fabrizio and guest Bob Woodward, or the expressiveness of dancers, or topics that strike at the heart, such as the raising of children, or the roles of social media, the awareness of sexual assault, suicide prevention, and community mental health, or of caring for our amazing environment, they increase our ability to respond as empathetic and caring community members and human beings. An organization like Park City Institute in a community like ours is so valuable. They miraculously continue to build a community of respect, of thoughtful deliberation, and of enjoyment and beauty, which increases our ability to respond to each other as people. During the holidays, when Holy Cross is serving countless families in need, we are especially grateful to our partners like the Park City Institute who give back year-round. The Park City Institute has consistently invited persons not able to afford exposure to the arts — so that all of us who live here have the opportunity to develop and use those pieces of us which are powerful and beautiful. It is a resource that we enjoy and need.

Love from Holy Cross Ministries' Park City team.

Sister Mary Ann Pajakowski
Holy Cross Ministries director of education

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Small-town art
Editor:

I grew up in a town of 4,000 people surrounded by very rich farmers and my parents were the founders of a concert series — live musicians — top artists who came to our large auditorium we shared with the high school. One year my father was president of the concert association and we served tea to the artists after the performance. I remember two artists from those years — Maryann Anderson and the Von Trapp family singers.

I also had a dear friend, Dory Schneider — she had two daughters younger than me who attended the concerts.

Marie Schneider grew up in a small town and everyone later was impacted by her performance in a wonderful way.

I try not to miss anything at the Eccles Center or any venue where the Park City Institute has been. I try to bring as many friends as Moe will allow.

No one has ever said I am sorry I came.

Mardi Hudson
Park City

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Not in my backyard
Editor:

Local newspapers over the past couple of weeks have included glossy real estate inserts that highlight some of the really nice and spacious homes for sale in Park City. One property in The Colony includes 22 bathrooms and eight bedrooms in some 33,000 square feet. The City Council may want to consider another bond issue to purchase that property, and others of similar size, and convert them into housing for our local workforce, such as bus drivers and seasonal workers at our resorts. The 33,000 square feet could easily be subdivided into 22 separate two-person apartments, each with its own bathroom, and still have lots of space left over for a large common kitchen, laundry area, spa, steam shower, wine cellar, media center, exercise facility, etc. It would have the advantage of being ski-in/ski-out so transportation would be readily available for the residents. The properties in such a program could be managed by the Community Social Equity person that the City Council was proposing to hire a few months ago.

Oh, wait a minute, NIMBY.

Ken Miller
Park City

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A New Year's resolution
Editor:

With the glow of Christmas barely behind us, we look forward to the new year and the customary New Year's resolutions: reduce social media, reduce weight and, this year, reduce animal food consumption.

One-third of consumers already report reducing their consumption of animal foods. Hundreds of school, college, hospital and corporate cafeterias have embraced Meatless Monday. Even fast-food chains Chipotle, Denny's, Panera, Subway, Taco Bell and White Castle are rolling out plant-based options.

A dozen startups, led by Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods, are creating healthy, eco-friendly, compassionate, convenient, delicious plant-based meat and dairy products. Meat industry giants Tyson Foods, Cargill and Canada's Maple Leaf Foods have invested heavily in plant-based meat development. So have a number of Microsoft, Google, Twitter and PayPal pioneers.

According to Plant-Based Foods Association, plant-based food sales have grown by 20 percent in the past year, 10 times the growth rate of all foods. Sales of plant-based cheeses, creamers, butter, yogurts and ice creams are exploding at a 50 percent growth rate. Plant-based milks now account for 15 percent of the milk market.

The plant-based New Year's resolution requires no sweat or deprivation — just some fun exploration of your favorite supermarket and food websites.

Pruitt Richardson
Park City