Letters: Park Record column regarding Sundance Code of Conduct was offensive | ParkRecord.com

Letters: Park Record column regarding Sundance Code of Conduct was offensive

Letter defending Trump was shocking

Editor:

I was shocked to read the letter defending President Trump's use of wording when referring to immigration from places like Haiti and African nations. I had to wonder if the author would have felt as compelled to defend the President had he chosen to say, "Haiti, African nations, and Park City, UT"? If the words used really don't matter, and we should just focus on the issue, then is it OK to call one's son a loser, if the issue is to get him to pursue excellence? Is it OK to call one's daughter a whore if the issue is to encourage her to choose her boyfriends more carefully? Before reading that letter I would have been unwilling to express my opinion openly that anyone who could choose to write, or agree with, an article defending the use of the president's language would have to be an uneducated, insensitive, racist, piece of (crap). I am so relieved to understand now that they would not take any offense since the choice of words is not really important.

Jim Hogan Park City

Sundance should be held accountable

Editor:

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My fiancee and I gave up on our Sundance ticket packages last week. We had waited in line at the Gateway Center for about an hour, during which time the 9 Sundance volunteers at the ticket office had handed out about 30 ticket packages. That's just over 3 per volunteer per hour.

The inefficiency I witnessed was breathtaking. Handing over a single ticket package involved 5-10 minutes of painstaking typing into tablets and filling out paper forms, while other volunteers stood by with nothing to do.

It's not the fault of the volunteers. My fiancee was a full-time Sundance volunteer herself four years in a row, where she observed this same inefficiency throughout the organization.

Organizations without accountability become inefficient. There is nobody measuring the throughput of ticket lines at Sundance, because nobody loses their job if festival-goers are inconvenienced. There is no layer of competent professional management optimizing the experience to prevent customers from being lost to the competition, because there is no competition. Sundance is like Christmas. It's part of our culture, and people will continue to attend Sundance, because it's Sundance.

But perhaps there is one organization that can and should hold the Sundance Institute accountable: Park City.

I occasionally hear rumblings of the possibility of Sundance abandoning Park City for another town. Maybe that discourages us from being too demanding. But maybe we are selling ourselves short.

Park City is a first class city, across the board. If Sundance wants to keep their festival here, they should get their act together. The people of Park City give a lot to Sundance. We should expect more than just discounted tickets in return.

Jonathan Warden Park City

Green initiatives are welcome

Editor:

Nice to see No Name Saloon is doing paperless with no straws.

Park City is doing that as well as no lids, at their resorts. This is happening at all Vail Resorts. They are going for no paper at all by 2030. This is great, need to go Green.

Wayne Schreck Park City

Enough with rallies during Sundance

Editor:

Please, please, please, no more marches or rallies during Sundance. Traffic is enough of a nightmare without bringing in thousands more people.

Ellen Sherk Park City

Local environmental injustice will cause climate change

Editor:

According to the International Electrotechnical Commission's "Efficient Electrical Energy Transmission and Distribution" (2007) we receive 55 to 60% of the energy burned at Utah coal-fired electricity generation plants due to transmission and conversion losses. All-electric vehicles play NIMBY (not in my back yard) moving pollution and greenhouse gas releases to southern Utah, exacerbating climate change. Hybrids are better.

According to Park City and Summit County Short Range Transit Development Plan, Appendix A: Technical Memorandum Demographics, Land Uses and Travel Patterns (2016) 60% of people who work in Summit County commute from outside the county (51% from Salt Lake, 33% from Wasatch) and 29% of people residing here work outside Summit County. This economic jobs/housing imbalance and continued sprawling single family development cause massive daily releases of 1 pound of carbon dioxide, a potent greenhouse gas, for each mile for each commuting vehicle. According to Utah professor Stephen Goldsmith, it takes 40 gallons of water to make one gallon of gas. This increasing traffic kills local wildlife in collisions, which, in turn, dries out local forests, decreasing plant biodiversity, increasing the likelihood of beetle blight on live trees and of forest fires that cause land to turn into desert, and, thus, climate to heat up. Voila! The end of our winter ski season is approaching if PCMC and Summit County policies and practices do not change.

Low-cost planning practices employed in Europe produce lower greenhouse gases per capita. E.g., form-based zoning (height, volume, setback, … restrictions but few use-based restrictions) and safer intersection designs create multi-use, walk-able, and bike-able neighborhoods. This allows property owners to create multi-use neighborhoods with mixed income housing and small retail and grocery stores. High-density development in mixed-use areas does not increase traffic or kill wildlife, but sprawling single-family developments with cul-de-sacs and anti-wildlife privacy fencing do.

Kathy Dopp Park City

Park Record Sundance column was offensive

Editor:

I am writing in response to Tom Clyde's column on the Sundance Code of Conduct. While I have appreciated his wit in the past, the January 20 column was disappointing.

Sexual harassment and misconduct are real — in Hollywood, in Utah, and it has happened here in Park City during past Festivals. I am grateful Sundance is taking action to ensure a safe place for artists and attendees.

The column's attempt to mock a legitimate process for reporting such behavior is offensive; and the decision to publish this article on the same morning thousands assembled at our local Respect Rally was insensitive.

The Festival's Code of Conduct and collaboration with the Utah Attorney General's office is an unprecedented effort to increase the safety of us all. The $150 million economic impact the Festival delivers to the people of Utah should quell any concern of incremental cost to the taxpayer.

Sundance's new Code of Conduct and the 24-hour hotline are not going to end sexual assault on their own, but with the support from all of us, it's a step in the right direction!

Nancy Garrison Sundance Institute Utah Advisory Board member

Sundance Code of Conduct is laudable

Editor:

I want to applaud the organizers at Sundance Film Festival for instituting their new Code of Conduct this year. There was an article in your January 20th issue by Tom Clyde criticizing its methods which I felt missed the point. Sundance Institute continues to be a leader as an organization by setting a national example with its swift and explicit action to make public safety a priority.

A speaker at a Sundance panel this week discussed how HR departments across the U.S. instituted harassment policies after Anita Hill's testimony to the Senate Judiciary Committee in 1991. She deliberated on why those policies were largely ineffectual and surmised that "policy can only succeed if culture evolves with it."

Bravo to Sundance Institute and to the AG's Office for taking a stand on a complex issue and leading a step in the direction of important societal (and indeed cultural) change.

Robin Marrouche Park City