Letters: Parkites should be compassionate toward the homeless | ParkRecord.com

Letters: Parkites should be compassionate toward the homeless

Homeless people deserve Parkites' compassion

Editor:

It's time Parkites realize there are people who happen to be homeless in Park City — like in other neighborhoods around the country. The problem with Park City is some citizens, and police, are trying to push them out of the area to prove the problem does not exist here. We have a responsibility to do our part to lend a helping hand besides food and clothing from religious institutions. What happened to the request for a shelter on church property near the blue roof? Temporary housing and services are necessary to help people move forward. Others just need a nice place to lay their head for a short while instead of sleeping on the ground, or in their car. Keep in mind, many people who are homeless have jobs but don't make enough to afford housing. Most people who are homeless in our country are women and children. These people need our help. Let them sleep in their car on your street for a night or two. Leave them alone if they are camping out in our mountains before winter. Most of all, we need to create shelter while they are here. You have nothing to fear.

Karen Brooks
Park City

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Logic behind Kilby design flawed

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Editor:

What Were They Thinking? As the construction on Kilby Road nears completion, the logic behind some of the design aspects of the project escapes my limited vision. Hopefully it is just me … and it all really does make sense.

First is the park and ride … just across the street from Ecker Hill Middle School. OK, let's plan to have non-school related people attracted to a locale across the street from our adolescent children. Let's add to the traffic there and add to the overall risk … right there at the school. Seriously, does this really make sense?

Next is the numerous turning lanes with attendant concrete medians which meander in and out of the lanes of traffic. Before, the drive was pretty much a straight line. Now it is anything but. Imagine how many cars will hit those 5-foot concrete curbs in the dark, in the snow or even in the daytime. Imagine the bent rims and flat tires and the accidents. And how will snow plows clear the road? Or will snow just pile up against those curbs, further narrowing the lanes? It might have been more logical, more cost efficient and less dangerous to have simply put a full time turning lane down the middle. And snow removal would have been as it always was, fast and efficient.

The work appears to have been well constructed. Kudos to the construction crews for managing this project. But the design and overall plans? Those beg the question: What were they thinking?

Jim Arnold
Park City

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Cows have no place on city-owned farm

Editor:

We would like to thank Lauren Lockey and David Swartz for the guest editorial, "Parkites have a beef with McPolin cows." As Park City residents, we were dismayed to learn that city-owned land is being used to raise cattle based on the spectacular fallacy that cattle are somehow good for the environment. As Lauren and David point out, using city land to graze cattle is decidedly at odds with other Park City environmental initiatives — and with a growing population of Park City vegans. Many people in this town and the larger world have realized that beef is an inefficient, inhumane source of protein that is detrimental to human health. We would enjoy seeing cows grazing at McPolin Farm, too — if we didn't have to think about them standing in line at the slaughterhouse and clogging the arteries of Park City diners.

Liz Hecht and Val Stephens
Park City

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McPolin cows are healthy for land

Editor:

I applaud the city's decision of regenerative agriculture on city lands. The choice of holistic management of city lands results in richly healthy soil microbiomes, management of the riparian areas, living roots in the ground at all times, organic fertilizer delivered without fossil fuels and the herd effect, which stimulates healthy plant growth two ways. One, by concentrating hoof action intensively for short periods of time, organic matter and fertilizer are massaged into the ground without tilling or diesel fuel, which results in more topsoil which, among other benefits creates an impressive drought proofing of the land as water can perk into this soil easily and the organic matter serves to hold the moisture instead of it running through the soil. Two, healthy plants need to be grazed to stimulate both healthy root and green growth. This is the same as human bodies do better stimulating contraction and extension of our vital organs. Yes, we can live without it, but we improve with the stimulation. Too much stimulation is unhealthy, not enough stimulation is unhealthy, so we are looking for just right — be it our bodies or our grazing. This holistic approach gets it just right by grazing for a short period of time with a long rest/recovery time. The city has taken a progressive step to care deeply about the long term health of our lands and actively manage them. So many political decisions are for the short term, it is a breath of fresh air to see progress for the long term.

Allison Florance
Park City

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A bus ride could have saved vacation

Editor:

I am sorry that the Osleger Family felt their vacation to Park City was ruined after they received a towing and impound fee for parking illegally on Sterling Drive in upper Deer Valley.

To be clear, this is a private road and the total financial responsibility for maintenance and repair rests solely on the many property owners that abut Sterling Drive. The signage is very clear that not only is it a private road, that violators will be towed. The fact that there were "15-20 cars already parked there" is immaterial. While I understand the parking can be problematic in the Silver Lake area (especially with an event going on), Sterling Drive was never constructed to act as overflow parking.

I have no idea who the "over zealous" person was who reported these violations, as I was riding in the National Ability Center's Summit Challenge that day (a shameless plug for a wonderful event) but there are many property owners that pay for the maintenance cost of the street.

There was a very simple option that the Oslegers didn't avail themselves of that could have prevented this situation: they could have taken the wonderful free bus up to Silver Lake (#4 Orange).

Catherine Morra
Park City

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Food trucks should be welcomed

Editor:

Centuries ago the English crown protected the British East India Company's interests to the extent that the two were indistinguishable. This cozy relationship eventually caused many acts of rebellion, one of which was the Boston Tea Party of 1773.

Large business has always sought government protection from competing small business and now we have this story playing out locally as Summit County and Park City maintain hostile attitudes toward allowing food trucks here in Expensive Restaurant Paradise. Various restaurant conglomerates and associations have not held back in voicing objections to the councils, and the councils are listening.

But it is the 21st century, not the 17th, and we know much better the benefits of encouraging small business and staving off the monopoly impulses of large business. I encourage Parkites who value diversity and opportunity to tell their elected servants, in no uncertain terms, to do what's necessary to welcome food trucks, and soon.

Tom Horton
Park City