Letters: The final push is on to save Snow Ranch Pasture | ParkRecord.com

Letters: The final push is on to save Snow Ranch Pasture

Finish the final push

Editor:

I am writing to ask the broader Park City community to come together to secure the preservation of the Armstrong Snow Ranch Pastures sponsored by Utah Open Lands. Utah Open Lands needs to raise just over $1 million to complete this effort. Everyone can help if we make widespread personal donations.

I know there are many demands on everyone’s hard-earned dollars. I, like many others, was dismayed that the full amount to secure Snow Ranch Pastures was not included in last year’s bond initiative to stop the Treasure development, so there is unfortunately more work to do to secure this open space and prevent the potential for another new real estate development.

This land is worthy of preservation for Park City and the broader community.

While not as prominent as the McPolin barn, the red barn on the Snow Ranch Pastures property is iconic, the surrounding land is large, beautiful, and a preserve for animals such as elk and moose.

As development at the base of Park City Mountain Resort becomes denser and traffic and congestion continues to increase, preserving this tract of land provides much needed open space around the mountain base.

Preserving Snow Ranch Pastures is consistent with Park City’s community values of preserving unique large and historic pieces of land for the community and visitors to enjoy.

Whether re-purposed for recreational use or preserved as a natural setting to offset ever-growing development, Snow Ranch Pastures is worthy of our attention and I urge everyone to help make a final push this week to preserve it forever.

Jennifer Adler
Park City


Embrace clean future

Editor:

I read with excitement your article on June 25 concerning the proposed wind farm in Summit County. As a technology consultant and former executive, I am all too aware of the transformational effect new technologies can have on a community and businesses. In my mind, this is more than just a wind farm — it is a step toward a future that is cleaner, less expensive and more sustainable than our current energy mix.

The reality is this: Renewable energy (solar, wind and, soon, nuclear fusion) is to fossil fuels what automobiles were to horses. This is not a political statement, it is just reality. Technologies that are less expensive and more efficient ALWAYS replace their predecessors over the long term. So the question is not “if” it will happen but “when,” and whether we will resist the process or make the best of what could be a significant opportunity.

Even the most resistant of our politicians are seeing that we are in the middle of an energy transformation. Mitt Romney, for example, just posted a video on his Twitter account acknowledging that we must make efforts to transform the way we view energy and the environment. And an increasing number of representatives are supporting H.R. 763, the Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act. We should welcome these efforts and encourage our representatives to support them! On the other side of this energy transformation lies not only a clean environment, but also long-term, high-tech jobs that will make Summit County more appealing to both industry and job-seekers.

Let’s make Summit County an example of forward thinking and move into the future with excitement and an eye toward the opportunities it creates. Again, this is not about politics. It is about the way we see change and technological advancement. I encourage all of us to embrace what can be a clean, vibrant future!

KC Hildreth
Park City


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