Letters: Transportation officials need adult supervision | ParkRecord.com

Letters: Transportation officials need adult supervision

Adult supervision needed

Editor:

It looks like the Summit County transportation department and UDOT are at it again. This time it is a $10 million project to build two roundabouts at the Jeremy Ranch exit of I-80 to accommodate future growth of subdivisions that have pretty much maxed out. These would be the perfect complement to the ugly scar of a noise barrier demanded in this same area by a couple dozen residents of Jeremy Ranch to deal with the noise they didn’t notice when buying a home on a major highway, just like their brethren who bought homes under the glide path of a major airport and then complained about the noise of jets taking off and landing above their homes.

We all get to pay for their mistakes.

But this is in line with the disaster of the dangerous snake river that Kilby Road has become, leading to the world’s most expensive parking lot to nowhere located across from Ecker Hill which is still undergoing “improvements” over tunnels seldom used going to the dozen or so cars parked there every day.

Just up the hill at Summit Park, you can find a multi-million dollar bridge used by a couple dozen critters once in a while that UDOT said was the best way to prevent them from crossing the highway instead of high fences and cattle grids at a fraction of the cost.

A better project would be painting lines on I-80 or funding law enforcement to issue citations for the hundreds of people who make dangerous and illegal left-hand turns at the junction which would reduce the number of accidents there. Maybe some of the money could go towards paying for snowplows to go through subdivisions enough to widen them beyond single lanes.

It’s time for some adult supervision of this dangerous department before they do even more damage.

John Adams
Park City

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A physician assistant is not a doctor

Editor:

Having worked with physician assistants and nurse practitioners for over 30 years, I felt I needed to correct some misinformation in the article “‘The Providers’ focuses on clinic in New Mexico.” Armstrong is mistaken when she states “a PA can do anything a doctor does. They go through the same in-line training.” In fact, a Medical Doctor (MD or DO) completes four years of undergraduate education, four more years of medical school, followed by three to 15 years of additional training, which encompasses internship (one year), residency (two to six years) and fellowship (one year or more). PA school can be entered usually after four years of undergraduate studies and is typically completed in 1 1/2 to two years. Some, but not all, elect to do a PA residency, usually one two two years; PAs in fact can and do specialize in surgical care, orthopedics, emergency, etc. In addition, PAs require supervision by a physician, which may entail direct supervision or simply cosigning orders and charts after reviewing the patient’s evaluation by the PA.

Don’t get me wrong: I have the utmost respect for the PAs with whom I have worked and currently work. During my emergency residency at L.A. County-USC Medical Center, I was taught the finer techniques of suturing and placing chest tubes by PAs who had been medics in the Vietnam War; I continue to learn from the emergency residency trained PAs with whom I currently work. But for students considering medicine as a career or people considering a mid-life career change and don’t want to put in 10-15 years of training, becoming a PA might be a terrific pathway, because, no, it’s not “the same in-line training as a physician.”

Mary Kaye Ashkenaze, M.D.
Laguna Niguel, California

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Circus of indignation

Editor:

This past week has been an amusing mix of indignation, embarrassment, offense, denial of intent and lame explanations.

Lucy: Obviously you were uncomfortable with the whole neck rubbing, hair sniffing and hair kissing affair. I understand that you might not want to make a scene on stage at a hi-viz political event. But did you say anything directly to Uncle Joe immediately afterwards? Did you tell him that it made you very uncomfortable and please-don’t-ever-do-that-to-me-again? You want to be a public figure, but don’t have the gumption to confront someone directly when you are offended? And then you wait several years before going on TV to be offended? You damage the reputation of women everywhere as strong, capable leaders of organizations!

Joe: Let’s face it, you are a semi-dirty old man. I realize that Nancy Pelosi says that you’re an “affectionate person,” “times have changed,” and her “grandchildren love you.” You’ve continued this touchy-feely behavior your entire life. Has no one ever called you out on it? Did your political antennae never tell you that some people are uneasy with and do not appreciate this conduct? Time for another apology tour, Joe. Confess the sins of your past (Anita Hill), and maintain that you’ve seen the light and won’t ever do it again.

News Media: Thanks for another circus of indignation and moralizing. Skip over the suspicious timing of the allegations, lame explanations and endless moralizing of politicians and talking heads. Spend more time on issues of importance to our country.

Then again, maybe this whole affair is a cleverly disguised attempt to cull an old white guy from the bus-load of presidential candidates. (But that would be age bias, gender bias, and sex discrimination…)

Ken Miller
Park City