Letters: Two-time Olympian says anti-doping act is vital | ParkRecord.com

Letters: Two-time Olympian says anti-doping act is vital


Letters

Athletes support anti-doping law

On Wednesday the Rodchenkov Anti-Doping Act, known as RADA, was approved by the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, & Transportation. The bill, which will criminalize institutional doping and bring the power of federal law enforcement to the fight for clean sport, is now only one step away from the president’s desk, where it will be signed into law. RADA passed the U.S. House of Representatives unanimously in the fall, and we, as clean athletes, expect it to do the same in the Senate.

This bill is especially important here in Utah, home to U.S. Ski & Snowboard, U.S. Speedskating and dozens of Olympic and Paralympic champions. As the Beehive State considers whether to bid for another Olympic and Paralympic Games, we as athletes expect our leaders to prioritize the integrity of competition at every turn.

Utah Sens. Mike Lee and Mitt Romney will play a critical role in the passage of the Rodchenkov Anti-Doping Act, and Utah’s athletes are counting on them to support the bill and ensure that we have a level playing field now and into the future. Too many of Utah’s champions have been the victims of international doping conspiracies, and the time to say “no more” is now.

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The Olympic and Paralympic sports movements are united in support of RADA. The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee (USOPC), USOPC Athletes’ Advisory Council, U.S. Ski and Snowboard, U.S. Ski and Snowboard Athletes’ Council, U.S. Speedskating, and dozens of other sport organizations have officially pledged their support.

The Rodchenkov Anti-Doping Act is the right thing for Utah’s athletes, its fans and its Olympic legacy. Sens. Lee and Romney must support this important piece of legislation.

Noah Hoffman

Two-time Olympian residing in Park City


Job isn’t finished yet

What a day. It was magic. As I pulled out of the driveway, the moon was a huge white ball high over the mountains. Fifty donors to Friends of Ski Mountain Mining History gathered at Park City Mountain Resort to ski First Tracks at 7:30. Halfway up Payday lift, the sun began to rise, dimming the light of the moon and sparkling on the perfect corduroy. Ski instructors guided us around until 9 a.m. when we gathered at Mid-Mountain Lodge for the most exquisite breakfast ever: cook-to-order omelets, bagels, Danish pastry, lobster eggs Benedict, crisp bacon, lox, fruit salad, cottage fries. … WOW!

Perfect as that all was, however it didn’t top Tom Kelly’s presentation about the history of skiing in Utah. What a showman he is! Of course, he’s had 32 years as spokesman for the U.S. Ski Team, 50 years of skiing and a lifetime of collecting photographs and stories about his interests. As old photographs from the Park City Museum collection flashed on the lodge walls, Tom told stories about the beginnings of skiing in Utah. He says it will become a book soon. I can’t wait for the book signing parties.

Not only did our faithful donors pony up more than $20,000, Park City Mountain and Vail Resorts’ EpicPromise presented us with their $25,000 matching check (for a second year in a row!) promised at Live PC Give PC. Not a minute too soon, either. Those old mine buildings we’re trying to stabilize seem to be losing a “piece here, a piece there” as fast as we can put them back together again. This summer will be the continuation of our race against gravity, rotten timbers, failing shafts and old age. We’re madly applying for grants to get structural engineering studies and construction drawings ready for the three months of summer construction ahead. Park City Mountain and the Vail Resorts corporate support have been our lifeline. Of our seven priority projects there, we’ve completed 3 1/2 … the easier stuff. Remaining are Thaynes Head Frame, Silver King Head Frame, King Con Ore Bin and the other half of the Thaynes Conveyor.

While we are eternally grateful for the help we’ve received, the job isn’t finished yet. We still need your love and support. Please contact me at 435-640-3759 or visit parkcityhistory.org/friends-of-ski-mountain-mining-history/donate/ to learn how you can join our cause!

Sally Elliott

Friends of Ski Mountain Mining History


Personal protection

In light of the recent local auto-pedestrian incidents, I’d like to share my perspective. I’ve been a runner for many, many years and because of my job I’ve run in towns all over the world. I’ve run marathons and untold number of shorter races, so I’ve spent thousands of hours out training on the roads, running in traffic. As springtime approaches and I see more and more runners and walkers out on the roads, I’m seriously alarmed at the number of people I see running or walking in the same direction as the traffic flow, with their back to the traffic. People, I’m telling you, the No. 1 rule of running or walking on a street is to run AGAINST the traffic flow. Never EVER run with your back to the traffic — always run facing traffic. It’s the only way you can see if a driver is distracted and drifting off the road, or if a construction truck has a 2-by-4 sticking out the side of the truck bed. If you run with music you are doubly endangered because you can’t see OR hear the approaching danger. Please, let’s not have any more pedestrians hit by cars in Park City; this is one easy way you can keep yourself safe.

Mike Stevens

Park City


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