Letters: USA Nordic thanks Park City for world-class event | ParkRecord.com

Letters: USA Nordic thanks Park City for world-class event

World class, without breaking a sweat
Editor:

On behalf of all USA Nordic athletes, thanks to everyone in our hometown of Park City for coming out to support the FIS Nordic Combined Continental Cup and FIS Cup Ski Jumping presented by USANA this past week. It meant a lot to the athletes to have fans from the community volunteering at the venue, around the fire pits at the bottom of the jumps, and especially the support from local companies like Uncharted Supply and Jaybird.

A year ago we had thousands gathered for the Olympic Trials. USA Nordic is proud to bring that same excitement back each year, providing a platform for our athletes to perform and entertain. This was a great event and one we plan on making perennial so that Park City can count on a good time at the ski jumps every December!

From an amazing race at Jeremy Ranch, epic jumping at Utah Olympic Park to the incredible hospitality of the newly revamped Peaks Hotel for 100 folks from a dozen nations, this community once again proved it can host world-class events without breaking a sweat.

A sincere thanks to all who supported and came out to cheer! Look forward to seeing you again next year.

Happy Holidays from all of us at USA Nordic.

Bill Demong
USA Nordic executive director

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Sundance supports Park City Institute
Editor:

On behalf of the Sundance Institute, we are writing to voice our support for the fundraising campaign Park City Institute is undertaking to complete by Dec. 31. We are proud of the long-term association our organizations have maintained.

The Sundance Institute has hosted its annual Sundance Film Festival in Park City since 1985. Sundance Institute and Park City Institute began their association at the time Park City Institute starting programming the George S. and Dolores Dore Eccles Center for the Performing Arts back in 1998. Sundance Institute has a long-term lease with Park City Institute to proudly use the Eccles Center theater as one of its premiere theater locations during its Festival.

We are appreciative and thankful for the high-quality programming Park City Institute provides each year to the community of Park City at the George S. and Dolores Dore Eccles Center for the Performing Arts. We look forward to enjoying its programming hopefully for years to come.

Robert Redford, founder and president; Keri Putnam, executive director; Betsy Wallace, managing director
Sundance Institute

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Stand on your own two feet
Editor:

Trump is fighting against the military industrial complex about which Eisenhower warned us years ago.

I was born in 1943, in the middle of World War II. Then came the Korean War. Then came the Vietnam War, in which I served. Then came the Middle East War, which is still going on.

If we took a poll today asking whether America should have been in Vietnam I’ll bet 80-90 percent would say “No.”

If we take the same poll 25 years from now regarding the Middle East I’ll bet we would get the same answer: “No.”

Trump thinks every country should take care of itself; European countries, Japan, etc. And no more help from America.

Stand on your own two feet.

David G. Clark
Park City

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Twisted souls
Editor:

I want to thank the Senate for their 2018 Christmas gift. A government partially shutdown and a border still partially open is what I expected. This gift from my senators convinces me my beliefs in senators were right. Senate members are arrogant, out-of-touch, selfish, overpaid citizen employees who always put the demands of their special interest donors above the needs of their constituents. I’ll continue to pray for them, that God may help these senators untwist their corrupt souls.

Richard Amann
Henderson, Nevada

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Not another carpetbagger
Editor:

It was with dismay that I read of the very serious financial crisis facing the Park City Institute.

It is clear from the article and previous comments made by the Institute’s Executive Director Teri Orr that the primary precipitating event at the root of the crisis is the unexpected and untimely necessity of finding a new venue for the St. Regis Big Stars, Bright Nights concert series. This occurred with short notice and the Institute had to scramble to find alternative venues at great cost and inconvenience.

It is distressing that Alterra Mountain Company, the new owners of Deer Valley Resort, immediately showed themselves to be unconcerned about our community. They are certainly within their rights to ask the Institute to vacate the Snow Park Amphitheater after 14 years but could have certainly allowed them one more season to make adequate alternative arrangements.

I implore Alterra to “step up” and make a significant financial contribution to the Institute to help remedy an avoidable situation for which they are mostly responsible. Park City is still a small town and is comprised of many “good neighbors.” I sincerely hope Alterra will become an integral part of our community and not another “carpetbagger” with no interest in Park City other than financial.

Vincent A. Novack
Park City

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Closure would be a huge loss
Editor:

My husband and I attend every performance put on by the Park City Institute at the Eccles Center in town. The Park City Institute has brought to Park City a world-class venue of speakers and productions. My husband and I do not pick and choose what to attend. We go to all of them. As a consequence, we have been delighted with so many new ideas and entertainment that we would not have had the insight to choose. If the Institute is forced to close its doors it will be a huge loss for the town’s soul.

These performances and speakers have helped my husband and me to be a bit more thoughtful and kind. Isn’t this what the arts are meant to do? We will be devastated if they close.

Deborah and Ken March
Kamas

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Dog food for thought
Editor:

While reading about the slow ticket sales of the Park City Institute, I was reminded of a business parable:

There was a venture-funded dog food company on the verge of collapse due to low sales. The CEO gathered the heads of the departments together to determine the problem. He started by calling on the VP of Product Formulation and Design who said: “We design our dog food working with the leading food and nutrition scientists; the shape of our dog food kibbles, our labels and packaging is the work of Italian designers. I can assure you that the issue isn’t in product formulation or design.”

The CEO then called on the VP of Marketing who said: “We use both traditional and cutting edge marketing techniques. Why, one of our print ads just won an award and our social media department is known as THE place to work in our industry. I can assure you, we are cutting edge.”

The CEO then called on the VP of Manufacturing who said: “We use cutting edge technology to assure that each kibble of our dog food conforms to the Italian design standards (and gave a shout out to the VP of Product Formulation and Design). I can assure you, no other dog food company manufactures with the same precision.”

The CEO called on all other VPs who assured their departments were models of efficiency and effectiveness. At the end of the presentations, the CEO became frustrated and shouted: “We need to figure out what’s wrong. Everyone here assures me of the highest standards and performance, but our sales are awful! Does anyone know what’s going on? From the back of the room, the janitor raised his hand and said: “I can tell you what’s going on, the dogs don’t like our dog food.”

Just some “dog food” for thought.

John Fry
Park City


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