Letters: Why spend tax dollars on art at the roundabouts? | ParkRecord.com

Letters: Why spend tax dollars on art at the roundabouts?


Inappropriate allocation

Editor:

Last week I read in The Park Record that the county has allocated $200,000 for art at the roundabouts. Am I the only taxpayer who finds this inappropriate? First, the project is costing more than the original estimate so one would think county officials would be looking for ways to save money. Second, these are huge roundabouts and are designed to keep pedestrians out of the center of the traffic circle. So any art would have to be large to be viewable from a distance. I am also wonder why we would want to put a distraction in the middle of the largest, most complex traffic circles in the area.

Landscaping is already planned for the interior of these roundabouts. I submit that is enough.

Dave Vecchi

Pinebrook


A town that has your back(pack)

Editor:

Recently, I left my backpack at the high school baseball field as I was in a hurry to get home after a long day of school. I am writing this letter to thank the person/people who found and took my backpack to the police station that Tuesday evening. I greatly appreciate that they took the time to pick up the backpack and take it to the police station. I am thankful I live in such a great town where there are residents that are willing to take the time to help others.

Chris Maulding

Park City High School sophomore


Educate yourself about port

Editor:

I am hoping that more people will research and get involved in what is happening in our backyard — Salt Lake City. The Inland Port is becoming more of a reality, and from what I have learned at a recent meeting, the start of giant warehouses may already be underway close to the shores of our Great Salt Lake. This “port” is a truly giant freight transfer and warehousing facility slated for the city’s northwest side. From what I understand, it involves a good 10,000 acres of undeveloped land which is part of the Great Salt Lake ecosystem (a critical ecosystem for more than 10 million migratory birds from over 300 species). It worries me when I hear that environmental impact assessments have not been done, that the Great Salt Lake is fragile and already suffering from recent droughts and increased water usage. Please let’s all continue to educate ourselves and make our voices heard on important issues like this. For more information you can look at stopthepollutingport.org.

Jean Tabin

Snyderville Basin


Keep Becca’s underrepresented voice

Editor:

When Becca Gerber first ran for Park City Council in 2015, I urged voters to choose Becca based on our personal experience with her. She had cared for our young children for many years and we knew her to be loving, honest, smart, positive, energetic and consistent, with a level head, high expectations, creative problem-solving skills and the ability to bridge gaps. Becca was also a Park City native, uniquely protective of its character, community and future. I trusted her to care for our children and knew that voters could trust her to care for Park City, which they did. Becca has now proven that this trust was well placed.

Having served on the Council for the past four years, Becca is a known quantity. In 2015, she spoke passionately about protecting Park City’s historic character, affordable housing and sustainability. These goals resonated and, once trusted by the community with a seat on Council, she has made decisions consistent with them. Her goals helped inform the city’s goals. Acting together, the City Council has taken bold steps to preserve the town’s historic character and its natural environment, while making it increasingly more affordable, economically diverse and inclusive. Becca has worked hard toward the goals she outlined in 2015 and, if reelected, you can be sure that she will continue to do what she says.

Few young people run for elected office, given financial constraints, work and family obligations. As a result, few cities benefit from that critical perspective in municipal decision-making. Because of Becca, Park City is one of the lucky few. Back in 2015, she was single, working full-time and part of the housing rental market. Becca has since married the owner of a small, Park City-based business, become a working mother and purchased a home. Her changed circumstances have only better informed her understanding of what it means to be a young citizen of Park City. Voters would be wise to keep her critical yet underrepresented voice in the room.

Vote for Becca for reelection to Park City Council on Nov. 5!

Maggie AbuHaidar

Park Meadows


Nann will be an asset

Editor:

I support Nann Worel for re-election to the Park City Council. We need someone on the City Council who can stand up for our community vision and values. Nann is that person. I know Nann personally and I have worked with her in her roles as city councilor, planning commissioner and as liaison to the museum and historical society board. Nann is sincere, conscientious and a hard worker. Nann is committed to the goals that keep Park City a great mountain community. She played an important role in preserving large open space parcels, Treasure Hill, Armstrong and Bonanza Flat that are crucial in preserving our town. She is committed to the goals of making Park City a community where everyone feels welcome and safe. Her extensive work with many nonprofits in town gives her valuable knowledge of our community’s strengths and needs. As we continue to face the pressures of affordability, overcrowding and congestion, Nann will be an asset on our City Council. Please vote for Nann Worel.

Cindy Matsumoto

Park Meadows


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