Bike to Work Day focuses on need for more trails and safer streets | ParkRecord.com

Bike to Work Day focuses on need for more trails and safer streets

The Park Record

It helped that Park City’s Bike to Work Day on Friday coincided with balmy weather and a mere smattering of light, off-season traffic. Those who participated by biking or walking to work likely experienced the full range of perks that come with non-motorized transportation the scent of flowering trees on Park Avenue and a hint of wood smoke in Old Town, a conversation with another stroller and a hundred random observations about the scenery that would have gone unnoticed from behind a windshield.

At the Yarrow Hotel on Kearns Boulevard, where the event organizers, the Mountain Trails Foundation and the Park City Chamber/Bureau. had set up a table of maps, T-shirts and snacks, a steady stream of bipeds stopped by to offer enthusiastic support. Passersby included mountain bike-equipped Park City Police officers, a ski resort president who biked in from Coalville, a realtor who cruises to sales calls on two wheels, several City Hall staffers and many others. All agreed that forsaking their cars for the day was a noble and even enjoyable gesture.

One of the catalysts of the day, Mountain Trails Director Carol Potter was all smiles, but admitted that her wheels were already spinning in a multitude of future directions. In addition to distributing the new Road Cyclist Guide to the Wasatch Back map, and the 2006 trail map, Potter is planning to organize outreach efforts to smooth relationships between motorists and cyclists on the East Side of Summit County. A committee that she convened is also hoping to install "Share the Road" signs along some of the busier thoroughfares around the area.

Coincidentally, Thursday night, a coalition of families cycled up to City Hall to encourage their elected officials to ensure the safety of future generations of walkers and riders in Park City. They asked the City Council for $100,000 to fund a study to spotlight current traffic conflicts and map out new bike paths and trail extensions. The ad hoc Coalition for Safe Streets got a warm reception and were assured that the funding would be approved.

In light of the clear environmental, health and community benefits served by any effort to encourage non-motorized transportation, we applaud both Mountain Trails and the new Coalition for Safe Streets and ask all residents to continue to support them. For more information log on to http://www.mountaintrails.org/.