Historic restoration: the ultimate act of recyling | ParkRecord.com

Historic restoration: the ultimate act of recyling

This weekend, Park City celebrates its historic homes and, importantly, the people who have restored them.

As is often noted, the dwindling inventory of authentic residential and commercial structures that dot Old Town give this booming resort city a unique sense of place and character. But, like some of the wildlife in and around Park City, the modest miners’ shacks and stately old buildings on Main Street are becoming an endangered species.

So, to encourage historic preservation, and to honor the property owners who have volunteered as caretakers of the town’s heritage, the Park City Historical Society each year hosts a Historic Home Tour.

This year, it is appropriate to also recognize these homeowners for their environmentalism. In a sense, restoring an old home is one of the purest forms of recycling.

Those who choose to rebuild, instead of turning over new ground, help to strengthen existing neighborhoods and slow the pace of urban sprawl. They make use of existing infrastructure and, in the case of historic structures, they add an irreplaceable cultural component to the city.

It is impossible these days not to notice the feverish pace of new construction throughout Park City and all of Summit County. As the area continues to mature, however, it will become more important to encourage restoration and rebuilding of existing homes and commercial buildings.

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The Park City Historical Society has the right idea in fact, some of the charming and equally historic communities on the East Side of the county might want to follow suit.

For a once-a-year peek inside some of Park City’s lovingly restored historic homes and perhaps for inspiration about recycling an older home, stop by the Marsac Building, to purchase a ticket. The tour takes place today, June 16, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.