Letters to the Editor | ParkRecord.com

Letters to the Editor

More skiing, less driving


Linking our Wasatch Mountains ski resorts is an idea whose time has come. It’s the opportunity for Utah to leapfrog Colorado by offering an unmatched snow experience. I’ve seen that advantage at work in France, my home country, that counts the largest number of interconnects.

At their inception, fear of letting loyal clients go to the competitor next door ran rampant. As soon as skiers flowed into the networks, the success was so overwhelming that it became the "de facto" business model. It creates true synergy by delivering a product that is much more than the sums of its parts.

Utah’s seven resorts linkage would offer over 15,000 acres of uninterrupted trails. With lifts so close together, we can easily develop a unique North American interconnect and secure enduring market dominance.

The last thing our resorts and towns need are extra roads or tunnels and, with them, more vehicular traffic to handle. A fraction of the $400 million mentioned in the state initiative could build park-and-ride facilities at the base of each canyon and the lifts needed to connect all seven resorts and the parking lots to the closest slopes. This would drastically cut traffic in Parley’s and Cottonwood canyons while park-and-ride facilities would address all access and parking needs for locals, complete with mass-transit spurs.

Of course, everyone agrees that each destination resort should retain and further develop its own identity. In the Alps, interconnected towns did not get homogenized and had no difficulty keeping and nurturing their distinct personalities.

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We can either continue on a path of raggedy growth by adding infrastructure when we must catch up to the competition, sometimes at great ecological cost, or we can proactively plan the most efficient ways for resorts to interact. We have the opportunity to create sustainable environmental conditions, maximize the appeal of the Wasatch Mountains and become the industry leader. Synergized in a linked mosaic, our resorts will showcase their differences and stand out as a region where visitors will enjoy a pristine environment, experience a unique adventure on snow and look forward to returning season after season.

Jean-François "J.F." Lanvers

Park City

Alternative transportation


I’ve seen something for the first time in Park City. It’s not haze, it’s SMOG. Our little town cannot help all the "big city" people that move here (and then want to make P.C. like the city they just came from- that’s another letter), but we can make changes to avoid P.C. becoming like L.A. We can walk, ride the bus and more. To the trails foundation: Keep up the good work. PCMC: Do the right thing. Put "standard" sidewalks in needed areas. Replace makeshift sidewalks with proper ones — the narrow, "single file person" ones without curbs (Monitor by Racquet Club). Keep sidewalks on the same side of the streets instead of zigzagging back and forth across streets — very dangerous for people trying to use them.

UDOT, get your act together; synchronize signals and have safe crosswalks, especially in busy pedestrian and traffic areas, like Kimball Junction. This will promote a nice, safe walking environment, for tourists and locals. We see it everyday: A river of cars going the same direction with one person in each car. No wonder S.R. 224 and 248 are a mess. For those who come here for work, try carpooling. Lots of people in your neighborhoods of Kamas, Heber, Midway, Coalville, etc. work in Park City! For those going between Park City and SLC, do the same: find a carpool, whether private or through organizations. Businesses: Promote and give incentives to people who carpool or use other transportation. Before moving here, I was in a five-person carpool. We didn’t all live in the same neighborhood nor work at the same place, but we found ways to make it work. I usually drove once a week, which saved time, money, car repairs and my sanity. Added bonuses were the friends I made and what had been long "solo" drives now flew by. Even if you can only carpool once or twice a week, it’ll make a difference. If everyone did this, we’d all see better conditions on our streets and in the air we breathe.

Kim Page

Park City

Quinn’s Jct. development


I am writing in response to Tom Farkas’ letter regarding the "development of the grounds at the National Ability Center" in Wednesday’s paper. Mr. Farkas is not alone in thinking that the recent development of fields and an ice arena is part of the National Ability Center, when in fact, the recent changes are all part of the Park City Sports Complex owned by Park City Municipal Corporation ("The City"). Just for the very reasons Mr. Farkas stated, the Ability Center has only one small patch of grass located adjacent to our playground — other areas are left in a natural state. I thank him for his reflection of the Quinn’s development being "an outstanding complex, which adds a great deal to the community." We agree that having the opportunities that the ice arena and ball fields bring to the area is remarkable.


Meeche White


PCHS Booster Club news


Attention all parents of PCHS athletic and academic clubs! The next Booster Club meeting is tonight, Nov. 8, at 7 p.m. in the high school cafeteria. We are in need of parents to represent each club on the board. Without your volunteer support it will cease to exist. We have many decisions and planning to do for the near and distant future. Bring your ideas and let’s get going! Contact Debbi Bessembinder at ktsmom22@yahoo.com or call 940-1115 for details.

Debbi Bessembinder

Park City

Record editorial staff ‘out to lunch’


The Park Record’s pre-Election Day editorial attacking both clerk candidates exposes their own ignorance.

The editorial attacked my opponent Kent Jones saying "the Summit County Commission was criticized for frequently meeting behind closed doors." Yet, the county attorney, not the county clerk, legally advises the commission regarding when or how to meet.

The editorial attacked Kent on the basis that "the minutes of the meetings were less detailed than they should have been" and insinuated that I would do the same. Yet, the clerk does not take the minutes of the Commission meetings now because Sue Follett hired a professional contractor/stenographer. If The Record has valid complaints, I would consider bringing that function back inside the clerk’s office by hiring an on-staff stenographer, if it seems necessary to improve current commission meeting minutes.

The Park Record wants our chief election official, Summit County Clerk, to be appointed, rather than elected, so that we’d be stuck with incompetent election officials. I attended a budget meeting on Oct. 30, with the current clerk, to request a new full-time election director and my scientific work on independent audits, which is published on the National Institute of Science and Technology voting Web site, makes me possibly the most qualified person in America to ensure that no one inside the clerk’s office, including myself, has to be trusted to accurately count our votes. See ElectionArchive.org.

The Park Record editors mischaracterized my work and invented fictions regarding my reasons for seeking office. It would be impossible to make up for The Record’s lack of responsible reporting regarding what scientists have discovered since 2003 about Diebold voting systems. I urge everyone, including the editorial staff, to read this: http://utahcountvotes.org/docs/WhatdotheExpertsSay.pdf and to watch the HBO documentary, "Hacking Democracy," about Utah’s Diebold voting systems, playing through Nov. 18.

Kathy Dopp

Park City

Third grade word play

Dear Rotary Club,

We love the dictionaries. We love everything inside them. We like the world maps inside. Everyone enjoys them. We’re glad that you gave them to us. We found some words we’ve never seen before. You are very nice to give them to us.

Yours truly,

Charlie Barth, Noah Band

and the other third graders

at McPolin Elementary

Halloween thank you


Thank you to all the wonderful merchants that made Halloween on Main and the Howl-O-Ween dog parade such a fun family outing again this year. Sergeant Bill Morris did an excellent job educating the public about Halloween safety during several live interviews on Salt Lake TV news spots. The fire and police departments stayed out in the cold to ensure guest safety. The city events department staff handled the guests, traffic and operations skillfully, as always. And we couldn’t make this work without the commitment of our annual volunteers! Thanks sincerely for another fun celebration!

Anita Wolfe,

Historic Main Street Business Alliance (HMBA)

Kimberley Kuehn,

Founder/Chair, Howl-O-Ween Dog Parade

Hollie Stray-Gundersen,

Triple Net Properties

(Village on Main Merchants)

Creating a culture

Coach Matich:

Welcome to Park City. Congratulations on a great season!! Your team made us all proud

Let me take exception to your comment in the Park Record, "They created a culture within the team, the school and the community, and they were the first to do that." A short history lesson will show that the winning culture was built during the past eight years by Coaches Mike Shepard, Tom DeLeone, Josh Jellerson, Jesse Schaub, Kevin Cochran, and many others. This program was one of the worst in the state prior to this dedicated group of coaches. Very competitive teams, much improved stadium facilities, and devoted fans resulted from their hard work. The Rotary Club recognized Coach Shepard for these successes by naming him "Citizen of the Year."

Let’s not tear down the hard work that went into creating the current tradition of Park City football, but reload and continue to build on the success.


Larry Rogers

Park City

A thank you to Randy Barton


As many of you out there may know, Randy Barton has been the driving force behind Mountain Town Stages for the last 7 years as well as an active member of the Park City community. He has been responsible for providing our community with free live music throughout the course of his tenure. Without Randy, you wouldn’t have seen the many bands that have played at the Canyons on Saturday nights during the spring and summer, you wouldn’t have enjoyed leisurely nights watching bands at the Fiore stage, or the performers at Miner’s Park. These are the things that many of us take for granted and don’t give a second thought to just how much work goes on behind the scenes in order to provide the community with free music each and every spring and summer. In addition to putting on free concerts, Randy has been a strong proponent of the local music scene and the local musicians themselves.

Randy will be stepping down from Mountain Town Stages at the end of the year and deserves kudos for what he has done for our musical community. Thanks, Randy, for all that you have done to support live music in Park City!

Brian Richards

Orion’s Music Shop

Mountain Town Stages Board Member

Dancin’ the night (or day) away


Treasure Mountain International Middle School Student Council would like to thank everyone who helped make our Halloween Dance Friday, Oct. 27 a great success. We’d like to send a big thank you to the local merchants who donated gift certificates and merchandise for our Costume Contest and Raffle: Cold Stone Creamery (at Redstone), J.W. Allen and Sons Toy Store, Jean Louis Restaurant, Orion’s Music Store, Starbucks and The Village Candy Shop.

Trevor Needham, president

TMIS Student Council