Letters to the Editor | ParkRecord.com

Letters to the Editor

Unfortunate firing

Editor:

I am distressed to learn of the firing of Park City High School boys’ soccer coach, Mike Guetschow. In his 10 years as coach, Mike has brought great success to the PCHS soccer program, winning numerous state championships, and has been a positive influence on many young men in our community.

Although his success in terms of won-loss records speaks for itself, the recent article in The Park Record about dads and sports memories, which quoted Mike, captured what is so great about him – celebrating the contributions and successes of each player, both on and off the field. His departure will be a great loss to high school sports.

Sincerely,

Carol Mahan Kahn

Park City

Recommended Stories For You

Reconsider walkability

Editor:

On Father’s Day my family was riding the rail trail up to Main Street when I witnessed my six-year-old son almost get hit by a car at the crosswalk on Bonanza Drive and Ironhorse Drive. I crossed the intersection with some friends, then stopped and waited for my husband and son who were behind us. As I turned I saw my husband in the middle of the street stopped, turning to check on our son who was right behind him. He screamed as a Dodge Durango turned left from Ironhorse onto Bonanza and was heading right at the two of them.

If he hadn’t yelled and the Subaru, which had stopped for them to cross, hadn’t honked, our son would have been hit. The car came within inches of him. I want to thank the fellow Parkite in the dark-colored Subaru for continuing to honk and chase down the Durango, as it appeared it was going to do. Being as we were on bikes and in shock, we couldn’t follow and don’t know if in fact the Durango was stopped. I can’t even begin to understand what the driver of that car was thinking.

This intersection is too dangerous as we all know. Mayor Williams and City Council, I implore you to reconsider your recommendations regarding the walkability study and the funds you have allocated. This is only one of several intersections connecting various parts of our town that is not safe. Band-Aid solutions will not solve these problems. This intersection in particular needs to be improved drastically. It needs to be done NOW before there is a fatality.

Jody Woods

Park City

We live in a great town

Editor:

The weekend of Father’s Day 2007 was a busy one in Old Town. Thank you to those people that volunteer on boards and have worked so hard to put together two fantastic events — the Park City Historic Home Tour and the debut of the Park Silly Sunday Market. There was a special energy in the air from all of your hard work. Park City is full of people that are making a difference by taking action and making our town a very special place. Way to go!

Sincerely,

Jean Carlan

Park City

Kudos and pesticides

Editor:

Loved the picture of the cat and the moose. What a wonderful place we live in!

Loved the picture of the goats eating noxious weeds. I just returned from Las Vegas where I saw my homeopathic physician. I had not been feeling well for several months but attributed it to age and its accompanying aches and pains. He discovered two pesticides in my system. Did I inhale them? Did I somehow consume them? Who knows? How many other individuals (young and old) around here are living with the same thing?

Kudos to Park City Mountain Resort for their forward thinking in using a natural resource to solve some of our local problems. I hope more private and governmental entities would do this kind of thinking; planning; and acting for a healthier and cleaner environment.

Sincerely,

Berna "BJ" Gayler

Park City

Where credit is due

Editor,

I just wanted to let you know how upset I am about the article regarding the fire up Echo canyon. I was completely shocked to not see a single word about the volunteer firefighters who were on the scene. Not only were they there, but also they were the first ones there, and it was their quick response, and quick thinking that saved those cabins. Both North Summit Fire and Evanston Fire were there. Most of the county is protected by volunteer firemen, people who after their 40-hour work weeks, give up their personal time and put their lives on the line to save lives and homes from fire. The least we can do for these brave men and women is thank them and at least acknowledge their presence and the work they do. I don’t think that’s too much to ask

Ashley Rowser

Henefer

Response to April Fool’s letter

Editor:

In response to Wednesday’s letter "April Fool’s Day again?" I used to work in West Valley City and commuted by bicycle three to four days a week. There were about 25 to 30 familiar faces I would see biking up and down Emigration Canyon in any given week. Instead of briefcases dangling from handlebars, they sported messenger bags over their shoulders. Riding on I-80 was way too dangerous, so I drove to Little Dell and rode from there each day. Having a paved trail that eliminates the need to be on I-80 would probably encourage more people to try this commute. Another benefit would be giving easy access all the way to Park City to the weekend cyclists who ride up Emigration from Salt Lake City. Why not make it easy for them to have a nice enjoyable day in Park City and support our local economy?

Sincerely,

Scott Wilson

Park City

Who are we to criticize?

Editor:

Great societies like the one we live in today rely on the collaboration of work forces. From builders to doctors, we all rely on each other’s skill in our professions in order for the economy to flourish. So why is it we constantly defy our scientists on the issue of global warming?

As Americans, it is our duty to question, criticize and voice our opinions. I have patiently sat back and listened to the argument for and against global warming for years and have seen a common "trend.’ The naysayers generally hypothesize that the warming Is a "trend" or "neo-ice age," wherein they are confronted by the scientist who rebut with charts, graphs and hard facts. Scientists all over the world have united on the front for global warming. Scientists from Princeton, Harvard, Cambridge and so on have done the research and shown the statistics. Neither I, nor most of the people reading this article, have recently conducted atmospheric tests measuring and comparing the trends in greenhouse gasses. They have.

I don’t see any articles telling Lance how to ride his bike, or the astronauts how to repair the I.S.S. When it comes to the astounding evidence revealed by scientists globally — who are we to criticize? We seem to devote so much time to attacking each other on the issue of global warming, while hundreds of tons of deadly gasses are being strewn into our ozone. It’s time to stop doubting our researchers and start collaborating to make the world a safer place. Considering our current reputation, isn’t it time for America to be a positive leader for change for the world?

Sincerely,

Connor Botkin

Park City

Schools fight heart disease

Editor:

For every newborn who clings to life in spite of a heart defect; for every loved one taken too soon by heart disease and stroke; for the millions of Americans of all ages whose lives are instantly and profoundly changed each year by heart disease and stroke This past school year, Park City students, school staff and parents set an example for the entire community by helping to save lives.

As youth market director for the Jump Rope For Heart and Hoops For Heart programs and on behalf of the American Heart Association, I want to send out a big thank you to all those who contributed to making this year a great success. Thanks to all the school coordinators — Jen Wheelwright at Parley’s Park Elementary School, Cathy Hinshaw at McPolin Elementary School, Dan Meier at Trailside Elementary School, Dana Ardovino at Park City High School and Chip Cook at Jeremy Ranch Elementary School. Through their hard work and efforts, more than $51,000 was raised to fight our greatest health risks heart disease and stroke.

The Jump Rope For Heart and Hoops For Heart programs promote the value of physical education to elementary and middle school students, while showing them they can contribute to their community’s welfare. Children also learn how a healthy lifestyle can fight the number one and number three killers of Americans heart disease and stroke.

It is estimated that in 2007, cardiovascular diseases and stroke will cost Americans more than $431 billion in health expenditures and lost productivity. Our efforts in the Jump Rope For Heart and Hoops For Heart programs will help the American Heart Association advance groundbreaking medical research, spread lifesaving knowledge and achieve stronger, longer lives for people in countless communities across our country.

Thanks again to everyone who helped make last year’s Jump Rope For Heart and Hoops For Heart programs such a rousing success! Hopefully, this year will be an even bigger success. With your support, we are making progress and saving lives.

Sincerely,

Cassidie Fenton

Youth market director

American Heart Association

Utah Division